Sex Statistics 2024: Surveys, Studies and Random Facts

Ah, sex sex sex. Why humans can’t think of anything else? We should learn from other animals, they actually think about many other ehmmm. Ok scratch that.

Sex, the world’s number 1 objective, the reason why anybody on this planet does anything at all. Remove sex and what’s left in this world? Nothing. Quite literally as we would come to extinction and disappear.

Anyway, enough sermons, we’ve wasted spent the last 6 months of our young lives digging into every single sex statistics we could find. We’ve gone to libraries (yes they still exist), we’ve googled the heck out of the internet and we’ve surveyed 12,609 USA based people.

Why? Well, I can’t tell you the real reason behind all this work (but if you’re a journalist or blogger and want to link to this page, then I would appreciate it wink wink), but let’s say: for the common good.

Thanks to us, you can now study this data and make more informed decisions about your sex life… Lol! I know you won’t and nobody will. We all know better than anyone else.

The data on this page comes from analyzing 459 sex related researches and statistics and it summarizes the findings across over 5,431,112 data points.

Click on the one you’re interested in and it will take you there. Enjoy!

Fun sex statistics

Statistics about various sex acts

Serious stuff


25 Shocking Sex World Records (2024) You Will Never Beat

Be honest, when it comes to sex, you’re always convinced that someone is else is bigger, better, faster, or slower at it than you are … and sadly, you’re about to find out that you’re completely right!

sex world records

Yes, we’ve combined two of the things most likely to bring out people’s voyeuristic side: Sex and weird world records. In other words, this is going to be the equivalent of looking through the keyhole of someone’s bedroom door, or watching a friend’s naughty self-recorded video, and then realising that their sex life makes yours look positively boring by comparison.

Anyway, we hope you don’t find this too depressing. Enjoy!

Sex World Records (Top Picks)

  • Longest Lasting Erection: Charles “Chick” Lennon, USA. 10 years. Side effect after penile implants!
  • Most Sex Partners: Louise and Martine Fokkens, twin prostitutes, Amsterdam. 177,500!
  • World’s Largest Penis: Jonah Falcon of Brooklyn, USA. 13.5 in (erect!).
  • Largest Vagina: Anna Bates, Nova Scotia. Diameter: 6 inches. Gave birth to a 32 lb child!
  • Longest Distance Anyone’s Ever Ejaculated: 18 feet 9 inches, Horst Shultz, USA
  • Fastest Anyone’s Ever Ejaculates: 42.7 miles per hour. Horst Shultz, USA.
  • The Highest Anyone’s Ever Ejaculated: 12ft 4in. What? Horst Shultz again? Seriously? Who is this guy?
  • Strongest Vagina: A new kind of weightlifting! Tatyana Kozhevnikova, Russia.
  • Largest Natural Breasts in the World: Norma Stitz, 102ZZZ weighting 85 pounds!
  • Largest Number of Orgasms in 1 Hour (female): 134, recorded at the Centre for Marital and Sexual Studies
  • Largest Number of Orgasms in 1 Hour (male): 16, also recorded at the Centre for Marital and Sexual Studies
  • Most Sex Partners in 1 Day: Lisa Sparxxx, Poland. 919 people. It all took place at Eroticon!
  • Loudest Sex: Olga Valerio and Byron Perez, NYC, 311 complaints from every floor of their apartment building!
  • Oldest Father Ever: 96 years old, Ramjit Raghav. The result of being a vegetarian wrestler!
  • Oldest Mother Ever (Natural Pregnancy): 67 years old, Xinju Tian. A natural conception (or so she says!)
  • Longest Ever Orgasm: A mystery woman who shall remain nameless. 45 seconds!
  • Largest Number of Orgasms in a Single Session: 226 times an hour, Deanna Webb, at “Maturbate-a-Thon”.
  • Most Male (Multiple) Orgasms: Test subject (laboratory setting). 6 times! Experienced multiple ejaculatory orgasms since the age of 15.
  • Longest Session of Masturbation (Men): Porn star, Sonny Nash, 10 hrs 10 mins (without climaxing!).
  • Most Semen from One Single Ejaculation: A whopping 8.5ml, another test subject in another lab (Sexy!)
  • Largest Orgy: Tokyo, 2006. 500 People (Who had to clean up afterwards?)
  • Most Orgasms in a Day: 100s, Dale Decker, USA, due to Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder
  • Most Amazing Amount of Vaginal Farts: Abby. Howard Stern Show. 93 in thirty seconds.
  • Largest, Most Powerful Sex Toy: The Kong. 18 kilograms, seventy pounds of torque
  • Creature Who has Sex Most Frequently: Australian cricket, 50 times in four hours

Our Favorites:

  • The World’s Largest Penis is Jonah Falcon’s, and measures 13.5 in when not “on the slack”.
  • The World’s Largest Vagina belonged to Anna Haining Bates, and would have dilated by 6 inches when she delivered her 23lb baby.
  • Internet folklore hero Horst Schultz supposedly holds three jizz-based titles: World’s Fastest, Furthest, and Highest Ejaculate.
  • In 2006, Lisa Sparxxx slept with 919 people during a 24-hour period, and she didn’t even insist on having 919 romantic candlelight dinners beforehand.
  • Do you think we truly have equal rights between men and women? Well, the highest number of orgasms a man’s ever had is 16 per hour, while for females, it’s 134.
  • Charles “Chick” Lennon had a decade-long erection. What a hard life.

1) Longest Lasting Erection: 10 Years

Like any wonder drug, those that keep you erect can have a variety of side effects, and it’s often suggested that if your erection last for more than a few hours then it’s probably time to head to the doctor.

Penile implants, however, can clearly have even more of a dramatic effect. Charles “Chick” Lennon ended up suing the company who gave him the implant, after the procedure left him with a penis that stayed hard for ten years, although on the positive side, he does now hold the title for longest lasting erection.

Mind you, that’s not much compensation when every pair of pants you buy has to be three sizes too big purely to hide your shame.

2) Most Sex Partners Overall: 177,500

If you’re going to have sex with this many people, then you need to dedicate some serious time to it. For most of us, there simply wouldn’t be enough time in the day … so it’s only really possible if you have sex for a living.

Louise and Martine Fokkens are not only 70-year-old prostitutes working the red light district of Amsterdam, but also twins, so we’re going to take a wild guess and say they’re pretty popular. And that definitely seems to be the case if the numbers are anything to go by.

Between them, they claim to have had sex with 355,000 men (177,500 each), during the last half a century.  These days, however, the sisters have decided they’re too old to carry on in this line of work, with Louise in particular complaining that her arthritis now makes some positions too painful, and if you’ve got to get into those positions 355,000 times, then that’s a pretty valid complaint.

3) The Largest Penis in the World: 13.5 Inches

Many teenage boys have probably claimed this title for themselves (before having it scientifically disproven in the showers after gym class) but the genuine holder of this illustrious title is Brooklyn’s Jonah Falcon.

Jonah’s flaccid member measured a whopping 9.5 in (24cm), although if he gets excited, you’d better stand back and give him some room. When erect, Jonah’s penis can reach a length of 13.5 in (34cm), as demonstrated on the 2006 TV show “The World’s Biggest Penis”.

In addition to this accolade, Jonah also claimed that he could completely envelope a doorknob with his foreskin, so we’ll be doing our best to avoid staying in the same hotels as Jonah from now on.

4) Largest Vagina in the World: (a diameter of) 6 Inches

So, how do you measure a vagina? You would assume, of course, that the larger you are as a person, then the larger your genitals would be. Surely everything’s in proportion, right?

Well, this certainly seemed to be the case with Canada’s Anna Bates, who lived during the nineteenth century.  This lady was big, and her vagina followed suit. She was 7 ft 11 (and a half!) inches in height, and weighed the seriously heavy amount of 419 lbs.

So, who would dare to suggest to a woman this large that they’d like to measure her vaginal? Well, no one, to be fair, but we can take an educated guess.

You see, we do know that Anna gave birth to a 32-lb child, and that its head had a circumference of 19 inches. Therefore, as it was a natural birth, her vagina likely dilated more than 6 inches (15cm) which led to her becoming a Guiness World Record holder after death … although we’re going to take a wild guess, and say this might not be the way she’d like to have been remembered.

5,6,7) Longest, Fastest, Highest Ejaculation

  • Longest Distance Anyone’s Ever Ejaculated: 18 feet 9inches
  • Fastest Anyone’s Ever Ejaculates: 42.7 miles per hour
  • The Highest Anyone’s Ever Ejaculated: 12ft 4in

When it comes to cum (is this grammatically correct?) Horst Shultz of the USA has quite a pedigree, as he claims to hold this unholy trinity of titles. In fact, his jet of semen would be seriously in danger of taking somebody’s eye out.

Well, apparently. You see, there’s officially no world record for speed or distance of ejaculation, and besides some online articles and comments on social media, there’s no proof whatsoever of Horst’s landmark achievement. In fact, according to a variety of doctors, this kind of thing would be medically impossible, even if you were the Incredible Hulk and had green, gamma-ray-powered semen.

Sadly, no photos of Shultz exist, not to mention his moment of glory, but he’s become a bit of an internet folk hero. In fact, one YouTube video about him has over 200,000 views, so he’s clearly a very inspiring figure for all of those young ambitious cum-shooters out there.

8) Strongest Vagina: Tatyana Kozhevnikova

Tatyana, who makes her living as a fitness instructor in Russia, managed to come the World Record Holder of this title back in 2009, by using her Kegel muscles to lift 31lbs (14kg).

Since then, Tatyana has created something called “intimate gymnastics” (and no, this isn’t just a euphemism for particularly energetic sex). This is designed to improve the intimate health of women everywhere, and if anyone should be able to teach a course on how to have healthy and strong private parts, then it’s Tatyana.

9) Largest Natural Breast: Size 102ZZZ, Norma Stitz

If you haven’t said this lady’s name out loud, then maybe just take a few seconds to do it now. Done? OK, I think we’re both on the same page now.

Norman Stitz, as you may have already guessed, is a softcore porn actress, who’s appeared in over 250 movies, and needs to travel with security because her fans recognise her in the street a lot. And to be fair, she’s probably not that difficult to spot, given that she has the largest natural breasts in the world.

Due to the condition gigantomastia (the main condition of which is the excessive growth of breast tissue) Norma’s breasts weigh a whopping 85 pounds, which means she also has a bra size of 102ZZZ.

In fact, Norma (real name “Annie”) had to start wearing a bra in the third grade, but she’s never even considered breast reduction. In Norma’s words: “Why fix something that’s not broken?”

10) Largest Number of Orgasms in an Hour (Female): 134

How many times can a woman climax in the course of sixty minutes? Well, according to scientists at The Centre for Marital and Sexual Studies, the answer is 134.

For those of you who aren’t mathematicians, that’s the crazy amount of two or more every sixty seconds, which scientists believe is the result of a continuous state of orgasm, lasting for a few minutes at a time.

This “status orgasmus” could obviously be quite distracting if you’re just trying to get through the day, but on the other hand, there are definitely worse ways to spend a few minutes.

11) Largest Number of Orgasms in 1 Hour (Man): 16

Sadly, for any men reading this, the winning number for most male orgasms/hour is significantly lower compared to the equivalent for women, although sixteen per hour is still pretty impressive.

In fact, this even seems impossible, given that most red-blooded males have a fifteen-minute refractory period, but according to William Hartman and Marilyn Fithian, who work at the Centre for Marital and Sexual Studies (and have been studying orgasm for 22 years) this figure is completely legit.

And doesn’t “studying orgasm” sound like a great job to have? It must be if you’re happy to keep doing it for 22 years!

12) Most Sex Partners in 1 Day: 919

It’s not a great surprise that there are a few adult movie stars on this list, and you’d need quite a bit of experience in the “industry” to attempt something like this.

At the Eroticon festival, back in 2006, porn actress Lisa Sparxxx slept with 919 men over the course of twelve hours, with each man being allocated forty-five seconds to make his contribution.

Lisa Sparxxx is Polish, by the way, and this seems to be a theme when it comes to the “World Gang Bang Record”. The previous record holders – Klaudia Figura in 2002, and Marianna Rokita in 2003 – were also Polish, and I think we can all agree that this inspiring trio of ladies have certainly done their country proud.

13) Loudest Sex Ever: 311 Complaints (Courtesy of Every Floor of the Apartment Building!

If your neighbours complained about the loudness of your sex noises, then you’d probably do your best to tone things down a bit, if only to save yourself the embarrassment!

Byron Perez and Olga Valerio, however, received noise complaints 311 times while getting it on in their New York apartment, from every single floor of the six-story building. To be fair, this was over the period of five years, not in one single night, and they also decided to open the windows during every session … but still, those are some serious volume levels!

Frankly, it’s surprising that the Statue of Liberty didn’t need to use some massive earplugs when Olga and Byron got down to it.

14) Oldest Father Ever: 96 years old, Ramjit Raghav

When most people reach the age of 96, they’re usually winding down, taking it easy, and enjoying their golden years. Not farmer Ramjit Raghav, however, because at that age, he became a Dad at the oldest age ever recorded.

Raghav. Who’s from Southern India, has credited his virility to his lifestyle, which includes a vegetarian diet, and a career in professional wrestling. Whether this is true or not, it certainly did something for his longevity because he lived to 104, although he never produced any more offspring.

This is a good thing, of course, because when you come into the world, toothless, wrinkled, and unable to eat solid foods, you don’t really want your Dad to be exactly the same way.

15) Oldest Mother Ever: 67 year old, Xinju Tian

In October 2019, Xinju Tian of Zaozhuang, China gave birth to a baby by C-section. Nothing unusual there, of course, unless you consider that she was 67 years old at the time.

Xinju Tian, along with her significant other, have always said that their baby was conceived naturally, although nobody’s been able to confirm this officially. In other words, there wasn’t a scientist sitting there at the time, taking notes, and let’s be honest, it would have been pretty weird if there had been.

Lab conditions just aren’t that sexy, and scattering rose petals on the bed is always a lot more effective than scattering test tubes and Petrie dishes.

16) Longest Lasting Orgasm: 45 Seconds

We all want orgasms to last longer, don’t we? I mean, who wouldn’t? It’s one of the most pleasurable things you can experience.

The average length, for women, is usually about 10 seconds, but one woman supposedly encountered an orgasm that lasted for around 45 seconds. So, yes, that’s one long orgasm, especially when you consider that for some men, the entire act of sex can take significantly less time than that.

She was also recorded to have had 25 individual contractions, which sounds intense, and would no doubt make you gyrate and moan more than that little girl from The Exorcist.

17) Largest Number of Orgasms in a Single Session (Female): 226

OK, this next entry wasn’t scientifically recorded, so it’s based purely on anecdotal evidence, but Deanna Webb reportedly climaxed 266 times in an hour, back in 2009, at an event in Denmark called “Maturbate-a-Thon”.

Yes, this event actually exists, and pretty much does what it says on the tin, even if it does sound like some fundraising show on a late-night X-Rated TV channel.

Mind you, if you could masturbate for charity, then Deanna Webb would probably be able to raise more funds than Bill Gates.

18) Most Male (Multiple) Orgasms: 6

Completely at the other end of the spectrum, we have a man who was able to climax six times without going floppy and did it all within 36 minutes.

This was as part of a study, carried out in a laboratory setting, and reported on by the Journal of Sex Education and Therapy. It’s also quite an achievement given that the results suggest that the man in question had no refractory period at all, and also mentioned that he’d been experiencing these multiple orgasms since the age of fifteen (which must have made for an interesting high school career!).

19) Longest Session of Masturbation (Men): 10 Hours 10 Minutes

This next record was also broken at a Masturbate-a-Thon, this time in 2012, by porn star Sonny Nash. The rules stated that each contender should stay erect without shooting his loads for as long as he possibly could … and when you’ve got that kind of brief, then it can only help to be a professional porn actor.

Completely thrashing the previous record holder, Masanobu Sato — who managed a very respectable 9 hours and 58 minutes in 2009 — Nash kept going for ten hours and ten minutes without climaxing, and has no doubt been forced to spend the rest of his life without walking.

20) 8.5ml is The Most Semen Produced in One Ejaculation

This next record should probably be titled “Most semen produced in one ejaculation … while in a lab!” Labs, as we’ve already mentioned, have never been particularly sexy, so there may be an even more impressive record taking place in a bedroom somewhere right now.

When it comes to scientific studies, however, one man in 1979 astounded the men in white coats by producing 8.5 ml in one ejaculation. Impressive, when you consider that the average is around 3 ml, but once again, it’s hard to know how you officially measure this.

I mean, I might be in the minority here, but the first thing on my mind after ejaculating is not to run and look for some kind of measuring device.

21) Largest Orgy: 500 People

Orgies, by their very nature, are large. That’s what makes them orgies. But even regular orgy enthusiasts probably have a number at which they draw the line.

This clearly wasn’t the case for the attendees of an orgy in Tokyo, however, back in 2006, who saw no problem with diving in amongst 500 sweaty, naked bodies.

This was reported on by the lifestyle organization “Menage Life” who claimed it was the biggest one ever recorded, and given the name of their organization, if anyone should have the most up-to-date data on orgies, then it’s them.

22) Most Orgasms Daily: Dale Decker, 100s

Hundreds of daily orgasms might sound like quite a pleasant way to live your life, but not if you have a condition known as Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder.

Dale Decker first developed this disorder after a nasty fall, when he damaged his spine, and now doesn’t even need to touch or stimulate himself before having an embarrassing sex accident.

He can be absolutely anywhere, at any time, when he suddenly climaxes, and this can happen hundreds and hundreds of times a day, which must make him a joy to invite to funerals, weddings, or children’s birthday parties.

Did you find any of these facts particularly mind-blowing, spine-tingling, or eye-watering? If so, which one was your favourite? Let us know below!

23)Most Amazing Amount of Vaginal Farts: 93 in thirty seconds

Ah, one of the unspoken after-effects of good vigorous sex. The humble “queef”.

You may or may not be familiar with radio “shock jock” Howard Stern, but if you’re not he’s had quite a few of these kind of guests on his show over the years. Back in 2007, for instance, Stern’s show featured a nurse called “Abby”, who had two lovely (although no doubt highly embarrassed) children back home, who we have to assume were not listening in as she demonstrated the amazing sound she could produce with her genitals.

Once she’d taken off her clothes in Howard’s cosy little radio studio, Abby set a new record by making ninety-three vaginal farts in a mere thirty seconds. Wow.

24)Largest, Most Powerful Sex Toy: 18 kilograms, seventy pounds of torque

Ladies and gentlemen, allow us to introduce you to The Kong. No, it’s not a massive ape that terrorises New York City, but in many ways it’s just as powerful.

This is actually a sex machine. Yes, that’s right, a machine that has sex with you, which thankfully (or perhaps, even more weirdly) can be operated by remote control.

It weighs a ridiculous eighteen kilograms, with seventy pounds of torque, so this isn’t the kind of thing you’d probably want to use if you’re into quiet, gentle, romantic lovemaking.
7 outrageous sex world records that will have you clutching your pearls (iol.co.za)
(IOL, 2022)

25)Creature Who has Sex Most Frequently: 50 times in four hours

So, yes, most of the records in this list are held by human beings, so we thought it was about time to represent the animal kingdom too – insects, in this case – because the holder of the record for most amount of humps in any given period is “Ornebius aperta”, an Australian cricket, who can do the dirty deed over fifty times in the course of about four hours.

Oh, and if you were wondering whether he has a harem of females, just waiting to be serviced, then no, this is all with the same lady. So, is it particularly intimate, romantic sex, we hear you ask? Well, no, not really. He effectively puts a bag of sperm on the lucky lady, and the female in question then eats it. Mmmm, tasty.


Sources


Sex Frequency Statistics (2024) – How Often Do Couples Have Sex?

Everybody likes having sex. It’s on everybody’s mind all the time; people structure their whole lives around the pursuit; one could say it’s what truly makes us human…right? Well, this old standby might not be as true as it once was. And, when you look a little deeper into some of the studies from reputable journals and publications worldwide, you might be surprised by the results.

how often do couples have sex

Sex Frequency Statistics (Key Facts)

The question remains. How often are Americans having sex? It’s a query that many people might ask themselves, but the answer doesn’t seem clear-cut. According to the research compiled here, the average American adult has sex about once a week.

While statistics about sex, who’s having it, and what all of it means can be elusive, here are some key takeaways from the research we’ve compiled:

  • In 2002, Americans were having sex about 64 times on average, per year. That activity had decreased to an average of 53 times yearly by the end of 2014.
  • Relationship status plays a large role in sexual frequency. Adults who have never been married have sex more often than adults who are or have been married.
  • A mere 26% of couples have sex at least once a week, with most couples having sex 1-2 times per month or less.
  • In 2018, 57% of Americans said they’d experienced a marked decrease in sex frequency, and only 8% reported an increase.
  • Almost one-third (29.35%) of Americans said they hadn’t had sex in the past year.
  • Men and women engage in the most sex between the ages of 25-29.
  • California is the most sexually active state in the U.S. based on contraceptive sales per capita and other metrics.

Which States in the U.S. Have the Most and Least Sex?

Two studies ranked U.S. states regarding their sexual activity. And while there is a shortage of scientifically rigorous studies regarding this information, we were still able to compile a list of the states reporting the most sexual activity, taking into account several different factors in these investigations.

  • Insider Monkey created a list ranking the states reporting the most sexual activity in America.
    • This list was compiled using a survey sponsored by Durex about sexual engagements and health, stats on the number of prophylactics sold, the number of people self-reporting that they engage in sexual activity, and a list of colleges known to be very active sexually.
    • The ranking is based on the frequency with which each state appears in various studies and surveys and the position of each state on the lists.
      • The 11 states reporting the most sexual activity, according to the study, are
        1. California
        2. Texas
        3. New York
        4. Oregon
        5. Colorado
        6. Arizona
        7. Washington
        8. Massachusetts
        9. Connecticut
        10. Missouri
        11. Utah
    • Statistics for each state include the percentage of respondents who reported ever engaging in a one-night stand and the average duration of sexual intercourse. It is worth noting that the ranking was based on limited and potentially unreliable sources, and the criteria used to determine sexual activity are not clear.
    • FourLoko created a list of the “thirstiest” states according to several factors based on Google search result data.
  • At a glance:
    • Rhode Island was ranked as the thirstiest state in the country, followed by Maine, Michigan, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.
    • Mississippi was ranked as the least likely hookup spot, followed by Louisiana, Alaska, West Virginia, and Oklahoma.

A full list of the “thirstiest” states in the country can be found here:

  • 1. Rhode Island
  • 2. Maine
  • 3. Michigan
  • 4. New Hampshire
  • 5. Massachusetts
  • 6. Ohio
  • 7. Pennsylvania
  • 8. Vermont
  • 9. Washington
  • 10. Wisconsin
  • 11. Colorado
  • 12. Florida
  • 13. Nevada
  • 14. Missouri
  • 15. Montana
  • 16. Minnesota
  • 17. Arizona
  • 18. Oregon
  • 19. New York
  • 20. Iowa
  • 21. Nebraska
  • 22. Delaware
  • 23. Connecticut
  • 24. Illinois
  • 25. Georgia
  • 26. North Carolina
  • 27. New Jersey
  • 28. Indiana
  • 29. Tennessee
  • 30. Kansas
  • 31. Wyoming
  • 32. Idaho
  • 33. Virginia
  • 34. North Dakota
  • 35. Kentucky
  • 36. Alabama
  • 37. New Mexico
  • 38. South Carolina
  • 39. Texas
  • 40. Hawaii
  • 41. Utah
  • 42. Maryland
  • 43. South Dakota
  • 44. California
  • 45. Arkansas
  • 46. Oklahoma
  • 47. West Virginia
  • 48. Alaska
  • 49. Louisiana
  • 50. Mississippi

How Often Are Adults Having Sex In America?

The sexual activity of American adults has fluctuated over the years. According to a study, in 2002:

  • Adults in the US had sex, on average, in 64 unique instances per year
  • That number shrunk to 53 times per year by 2014.
  • From the beginning of the 90s to right before the turn of the century, adults had sex at an average rate two times higher than in other periods included in the study.
  • Over the next ten-year period (2000-2010), the rate of sexual intercourse people reported having had gone down by 9 points on their scale.
    • This alludes to a very significant drop in overall sexual encounters during the early to late aughts.

There are also differences in sexual activity based on relationship status.

  • Adults who had never married had a higher amount of sex than those who were married.
    • Individuals who were never married had sex 70 times each year on average
    • Married people had sex 56 times each year
    • Approximately 46 times each year for divorceès, and roughly ten times each year for widows and widowers.

A survey of married couples in 2018 found that while 26 percent of couples said they were engaging in intercourse once each week, most reported having sex 1 or 2 times each month. They found that, for married couples:

  • 25% have sex once each week
  • 16% have sex 2 or 3 times each week
  • 5% have sex four or more times each week
  • 19% engage in sex 2 to 3 times every month
  • 17% have sex once every month
  • 7% had sex only 1 or 2 times over the preceding year,
  • and 10% had not engaged in intercourse in the preceding year.

According to that same 2018 survey,

  • A majority of Americans (57%) experienced a drop in their sexual activity for the year(s) surveyed
  • While only a small portion (8%) reported that their rate of sexual encounters had gone up.
  • The remaining 35% stated that their level of sexual activity remained unchanged.

In a 2021 survey by the GSS,

  • Almost 30% of Americans stated they had not engaged in sexual intercourse over the preceding year.
  • The remaining participants reported having sex throughout the year at varying levels:
    • ~12%
    • ~13% once every month
    • ~17% 2 or 3 times each month
    • ~13% once every week
    • ~12% 2 or 3 times each week
    • ~4% three or more sexual encounters every week.

How Often Are People in Various Age Brackets Having Sex?

While Americans in the 16-45 age range reportedly had high rates of sexual activity in 1991, data ranging from 2004-2009 showed that,

  • People over 45 had decreased rates of weekly sexual activity across the board.
    • Women in this age group’s sexual activity dropped from 43% down to 32%
    • The male rate decreased from a rate of 49% down to 41%.

Americans who were single and over the age of 45 reported having sex more than their married counterparts, with

  • 48% of single people reporting weekly sexual activity

compared to

  • 36% of participants who were married having weekly sex.

Over a two-year period (2016-2018), the majority of 18 to 44-year-old American adults said they were engaging in sex at least once a week, with variations in frequency regarding age and the participant’s gender.

Here is the age and gender breakdown from a 2020 study involving nearly 10,000 individuals:

  • 18-24
    • No sex in previous year
      • 31% of men
      • 19% of women
    • 1-2 times per year
      • 9% of men
      • 10% of women
    • 1-3 times per month
      • 23% of men
      • 18% of women
    • Once per week or more
      • 37% of men
      • 52% of women
  • 25-34
    • No sex in previous year
      • 12% of men
      • 11% of women
    • Once or twice per year
      • 6% of men
      • 6% of women
    • 1-3 times per month
      • 27% of men
      • 25% of women
    • Weekly or more
      • 50% of men
      • 54% of women
  • 35-44
    • No sex in previous year
      • 8% of men
      • 8.5% of women
    • 1-2 times per year
      • 11% of men
      • 8% of women
    • 1-3 times per month
      • 31% of men
      • 31.5% of women
    • Once per week or more
      • 50% of men
      • 53.5% of women

How Many Times Do People Have Sex Every Week?

A lot of the literature we looked at concerns more constrained age groups and longer periods of time. But research by the famed Kinsey Group, summarized in this article gives us a snapshot of the sexual activity of people in a given week. On average:

  • People 18-29
    • Have sexual intercourse two times every week
  • People 30-39
    • Have sexual intercourse 1.6 times every week.
  • People 40-49
    • Have sexual intercourse 1.3 times every week.

When are Men and Women their Most Sexually Active?

It’s only natural to wonder when you might hit your prime. This extends to a lot of different arenas, athleticism, cognitive function, and sex is definitely not an exception to this general desire.

According to our compiled research, we can give you an answer based on statistics!

  • Both men and women typically report the highest rates of sexual engagement and vaginal intercourse at ages 25-29.
    • This may be due, in part, to higher testosterone levels in males aged 19-40, which can boost libido and sexual function.

However, whether you’re in these age ranges or not, it’s worth noting that people of all appropriate legal ages can still enjoy a fulfilling sex life, and it’s never too late to start exploring and enjoying your sexuality.

Here are the numbers compiled from a study of nearly 6,000 men and women of various ages: [collapsible list]

Men:

  • Age 14-15
    • Sex in the past month – 7.9%
    • In the past year -8.9%
    • Lifetime – 9.9%
  • Age 16-17
    • Past month – 16.1%
    • Past year – 30.3%
    • Lifetime – 30.3%
  • Age 18-19
    • Past month – 31%
    • Past year – 52.8%
    • Lifetime – 62.5%
  • Age 20-24
    • Past month – 52%
    • Past year – 63.3%
    • Lifetime – 70.3%
  • Age 25-29
    • Past month – 74.4%
    • Past year – 85.7%
    • Lifetime – 89.3%
  • Age 30-39
    • Past month – 71.3%
    • Past year – 85.3%
    • Lifetime -92.6%
  • Age 40-49
    • Past month – 61%
    • Past year – 73.6%
    • Lifetime – 89.3%
  • Age 50-59
    • Past month – 44.1%
    • Past year – 57.9%
    • Lifetime – 85.8%
  • Age 60-69
    • Past month – 38.9%
    • Past year – 53.5%
    • Lifetime – 86.9%
  • Age 70+
    • Past month – 28.2%
    • Past year – 42.9%
    • Lifetime – 88.1%

And Women:

  • Age 14-15
    • Sex in the past month – 5.9%
    • In the past year -10.7%
    • Lifetime – 12.4%
  • Age 16-17
    • Past month – 20.8%
    • Past year – 29.7%
    • Lifetime – 31.6%
  • Age 18-19
    • Past month – 43.1%
    • Past year – 62%
    • Lifetime – 64%
  • Age 20-24
    • Past month – 61.9%
    • Past year – 79.9%
    • Lifetime – 85.6%
  • Age 25-29
    • Past month – 74.3%
    • Past year – 86.5%
    • Lifetime – 90.7%
  • Age 30-39
    • Past month – 63.5%
    • Past year – 73.5%
    • Lifetime – 88.7%
  • Age 40-49
    • Past month – 55.8%
    • Past year – 70.3%
    • Lifetime – 94.5%
  • Age 50-59
    • Past month – 39.9%
    • Past year – 51.4%
    • Lifetime – 94%
  • Age 60-69
    • Past month – 28.9%
    • Past year – 42.2%
    • Lifetime – 92.4%
  • Age 70+
    • Past month – 11.9%
    • Past year – 21.6%
    • Lifetime – 89.2%

When Do Women and Men Usually Stop Having Sex?

There is no specific age at which people stop engaging in and ultimately gaining satisfaction from sex, but some trends show that sexual engagement and fulfillment may decrease as we get older.

  • People over 53 who thought of aging as a negative reported decreased sexual enjoyment.

Additionally, feelings of getting older may also decrease sexual interest.

  • People between 50-80 have sex two times a month, with 37% of people in this age group no longer engaging in sexual activity.

And hey, it just so happens that among singles in this age group, 14% reported being open to having sex on the first date, while 30% said they had sex within the first three dates. So fear not, older daters. You can still get lucky on the first (or third) date!

Is there an Overall Decline in Sexual Activity?

One of the distressing things you might hear about if you spend any time looking into sex statistics is that there is a fertility crisis, and on top of that you might have heard about plummeting rates of intercourse, in general, in industrialized nations. A major survey of national sexual health looked at sexual frequency across a period from 2009-2018. But what do the numbers say?

  • The NSSHB was conducted in 2009 and 2018 to assess the changing landscape of sexual behavior among 14-49-year-olds in the United States.
    • The study aimed to look at penis-to-vaginal sex (PVI) from the period of 2009-2018 and examined the combinations of sexual behaviors engaged in by participants in both waves of the survey.
    • The study included over 4100 participants from the national survey (406 women, 414 men aged 14 to 17;1744 men and 1591 females aged 18 to 49) and 4547 participants from national survey in 2018 (411 young men and 416 young women, aged 14 to 17; 1713 males and 2007 females, aged 18 to 49).
  • The study found that in 2018, 28% of adult participants reported not having had penile-vaginal intercourse in the past year, compared to the 2009 rate of 24%.
  • Among adolescents (ages 14-17), 89% reported not having had penile-vaginal intercourse in the past year in 2018, compared to 79% not having any PVI in 2009.
  • The study also observed decreases in every configuration of sexual intercourse and solo masturbation among adolescents.
  • The NSSHB is a confidential, nationally representative survey of sexual behavior conducted online in the United States.
  • In addition to finding a decrease in PVI frequency, the study also observed a decrease in all modes of partnered sex among both adolescents and adults.
  • The study found that the decreases in sexual behavior were more pronounced among adolescents than adults.
  • Researchers have expressed concern about the potential consequences of declines in sexual frequency, including impacts on fertility, relationship happiness, and human connection and intimacy.

How has COVID-19 Affected Sexual Behavior?

A systematic review has found that the societal effects of COVID-19 have significantly impacted whether or not people engaged in sex, and how they functioned when they did, with women experiencing greater effects than men. The study analyzed 21 published papers and over 6100 participating individuals.

The results showed that pandemic restrictions were correlated with increased rates of sexual dysfunction and reduced sexual activity, with female participants experiencing a greater decrease in sexual functioning than male participants.

  • COVID-19 has had an impact on whether or not people chose to engage in sex, as evidenced by 21 studies that were included in the study.
  • The studies included 3765 men and 2454 women.
  • The study’s results showed that pandemic restrictions were related to increased sexual dysfunction and a decrease in sexual activity rates.
  • The change in sexual functioning was greater in women when compared to sexual functioning in men.
  • Participants stated their sexual engagements had decreased and masturbation rates had increased when compared to pre-pandemic rates.
  • The study suggests that sexologists should investigate and create programs focused on reducing the factors affecting sexual functioning due to COVID-19, as it relates to the psychological effects on people in communities experiencing pandemic restrictions.
  • The study found that the pandemic was correlated with statistically significant reductions in FSFI scores among women as well as IIEF-5 scores among men.
  • The study suggests that sex is an important dimension of every person’s life and that researchers need to pinpoint the factors contributing to sexual dysfunction as a result of pandemic conditions in their community.
  • The study analyzed the effects of the pandemic on sexual behavior among individuals across different countries, including China, Italy, France, and Iran.
  • The study found that the pandemic was correlated with statistically significant reductions in various aspects of sexual activity, including desire, ability to become aroused, natural lubrication, achievement of orgasm, overall satisfaction, and incidence of pain.
  • The study suggests that the pandemic may have had a greater impact on the sexual behavior of women as opposed to men and that further research is needed to understand the underlying reasons for this difference.

Conclusion

Human sexuality is a significant aspect of life that can vary in intensity and frequency. Generally, people tend to have more sex in their mid to late 20s, but this trend generally declines with age. Different communities and cultures may have different attitudes towards sex; some are more accepting and open about it, while others consider it taboo. Additionally, sexual behavior can vary among different generations. Ultimately, it is important to focus on your and your partner’s satisfaction with your sexual experiences rather than just how often you have them.

Sources


7PM The Most Popular Time to Have Sex – Study Reveals

Sex plays an essential role in our love life and it has the potential to make or break a relationship. But what if we need to work our sex life around our schedules?

Sometimes this is inevitable because of children, jobs or other activities we value.

LetsTalkSex.net has investigated our sexual routines and how covid19 has affected it in 2020. To do this, a survey of 2544 people aged 19 to 65 was carried out, alongside individual research into sex habits.

time sex

So what’s the most common time to have sex? It’s 7pm apparently.

And while quarantine has forced many people to stay at home this time has slowly been gearing down towards the beginning of the day.

What Time We Have Sex? 7PM Apparently

The research by LetsTalkSex.net has revealed that 34.2% of people have sex most often between 6pm and 8pm. We generally prefer to wait after work to spend intimate time with our loved ones.

chart 2

And it’s not all, 76% of survey respondents believe that covid19 has disrupted their routine and they tend to have sex earlier in the day now.

It seems that while 64% of men prefer to have sex in the morning (this is not surprising since testosterone’s level are naturally higher in the morning), 78% of women prefer to have sex in the afternoon or evening.

Rose 31: I think most women can agree that in the evening it’s better. I like to have a bath after work, put some perfume and feel good in my skin.

James 27: I like it in the morning. As soon as I wake up I’m ready to go and get to the office in a good mood.

Julia 25: My fiancée sends me naughty messages during the day, and I can’t wait to get back home from work…

Robert 36: I honestly don’t like having sex in the morning. I get tired and all day I feel tired. Maybe if you have sex for 2 minutes, it’s fine. But me and my wife really go at it and after we are exhausted. Now go to work like that…

Noemi 32: I remember when we started living together… we always found the time to have sex in the morning before university… Now we mostly do it after work or right in the middle of the night…

Almost half (45.2%) of survey respondents stated that their sex time is dictated by their work/study schedule, this means they prefer to have sex after work hours but not too late at night so to sleep enough to be fresh at work on the following day.

More than a third (39.4%) of participants claim that on weekend the hours shift towards the earlier part of the day, while 13.3% of participants claim to double it up to both earlier and later as well.

Survey Results

– At what time of the day do you have sex most often?

    • 00 – 02 10.9%
    • 02 – 04 8.3%
    • 04 – 06 2.3%
    • 06 – 08 16.6%
    • 08 – 10 1.2%
    • 10 – 12 0.5%
    • 12 – 14 0.4%
    • 14 – 16 1.1%
    • 16 – 18 1.8%
    • 18 – 20 34.2%
    • 20 – 22 14.6%
    • 22 – 24 8.1%

 – Has Covid19 and quarantine affected your sex habits?

    • Yes 76%
    • No 24%

– Which factors influence your sex time the most (Pick as many as apply)

    • Our work/university/gym schedule 45.2%
    • My partner’s desire 32%
    • My children 12%
    • My roommates 10.8%

– If you could choose one time of the day, without work restrictions, what would you choose?

Men:

    • Morning 64%
    • Afternoon/Evening 36%

Women:

    • Morning 22%
    • Afternoon/Evening 78%

– How does your habit change over weekends and holidays?

    • It doesn’t change 24%
    • We have sex earlier than during the week 39.4%
    • We have sex later than during the week 24.3%
    • We have sex both earlier and then again later 13.3%

Love Statistics About Relationships [2024 Data] – By Age, Gender & More

Love and relationships are universal experiences that can evoke a wide range of emotions. From the butterflies in your stomach when you meet someone new, to the heartache of a broken relationship, the human experience of love is both complex and fascinating.

In this article, we will look at love statistics and facts and explore the data behind the most common patterns and trends in relationships.

love statistics about relationships

Key Love Statistics

  • 15 to 18 is the most likely age to fall in love.
  • 17% of people fall in love after the age of 25.
  • 35% of people aged 13-17 have dated at least once
  • 25 is the most common age for women to fall in love.
  • 28 is the most common age for men to fall in love.
  • 10% of Americans are interracially married
  • 55% of people fall in love between 15-18.
  • Men tend to fall in love more than women.
  • 52% of people think men fall in love harder than women.
  • 18.51% of women say “I love you” to their partners first.
  • There’s a 10-year age gap between 10% of American couples.
  • There is a 68% chance for women to stay married for 10 years without getting a divorce.
  • Men have a 70% chance of their first marriage lasting for 10 years
  • 58% is the success rate of long distance relationships.
  • A relationship on average lasts for 2 years and 9 months.
  • An LDR would last for 4.5 months on average.
  • 4 in 10 Americans have experienced love at first sight.
  • Same-sex unmarried couples have a 76% chance of breaking up in the first year of a relationship.
  • LDRs have a 42% chance of ending at some stage.
  • The longest recorded marriage ever was 90 years and 291 days between the Indian couple Karam Chand and Kartari Chand.
  • The longest marriage according to the Guinness World Records lasted 86 years and 290 days between the US couple Herbert Fisher and Zelmyra Fisher.
  • The longest ongoing marriage happened in 1940 between Eugene Gladu and Dolores Gladu. They have been together for over 82 years.
  • Men are 48% more likely than women to fall in love at first sight

What are the statistics of relationships?

When it comes to understanding relationships, statistics can provide valuable insights into the most common patterns and trends. From the average length of a relationship to the factors that predict a successful marriage, these statistics can help us understand the complexities of love and relationships.

  • 88% of Americans marry due to love.
  • There is a 58% success rate for long distance relationships.
  • 35% of people aged 13-17 have dated at least once.
  • 75% of college students experienced long distance relationships.
  • 10% of Americans are interracially married.
  • There’s a 10-year age gap between 10% of American couples.

What are the statistics of finding love?

Finding love can be a challenging and sometimes frustrating experience, but understanding the statistics behind it can provide a valuable perspective.

  • Most people fall in love between the ages of 15 to 18.
  • Women fall in love at an average age of 25, whereas the average for men is 28.
  • Men are more likely to fall in love than women.

How Most People Meet Their Partners

How Couples Met19952017
Online2%39%
Bar / Restaurant19%27%
Through Friends33%20%
At Work19%11%
School / College19%9%
Through Family15%7%

At what age do most people find love?

One of the most common questions people have about relationships is at what age do most people find love.

  • 55% of people fall in love between the age group 15-18.
  • 20% of people fall in love between the age group 19-21.
  • 8% of people fall in love between the age group 22-25.
  • 17% of people fall in love after 25.

What age do girls fall in love?

  • Girls fall in love at an average age of 25.

What age do boys fall in love?

  • Boys fall in love at an average age of 28.

Which Gender Falls In Love Harder

Men and women may experience love differently, with men being more likely to focus on physical attraction and women being more likely to focus on emotional connection.

It is difficult to say definitively whether one gender falls in love harder than the other, as people’s experiences with love can vary widely and are influenced by a variety of factors.

  • 52% of people think men fall in love harder than women.
  • 48% of people think women fall in love harder than men.
  • 87.78% of people think women first fall in love in a relationship.
  • Men fall in love earlier than women.
  • 64% of men say “I love you” to their partners first.
  • 18.51% of women say “I love you” to their partners first.

Do men fall in love more?

  • Men fall in love quicker than women.
  • 48% of men are more likely than women to fall in love at first sight!

Why do boys fall in love easily?

There are a variety of reasons men may fall in love more easily than women. Let’s take a look at these:

According to a Scientific Research:

  • Men tend to express their feeling of love more quickly because women typically have a more selective approach when it comes to choosing a romantic partner.
  • Men have a high testosterone level which makes them fall in love easily because they are more inclined to pursue romantic relationships in order to satisfy their sexual desires.

How many times do we fall in love?

  • An average person falls in love three times.

Do people fall in love at first sight?

The concept of falling in love at first sight is a popular one in literature, movies, and pop culture, but whether it is a real phenomenon is a topic of debate among scientists and researchers.

Some studies have found that people can experience a strong physical attraction or “love at first sight” feeling when they first meet someone, but it’s important to note that this initial attraction is not necessarily the same thing as love.

  • 52% of American adults believe in love at first sight.
  • 60% of people aged 18-29 think love at first sight can happen.
  • 56% of people aged 30-49 believe in love at first sight.
  • 43% of people over 50 believe in love at first sight.
  • 4 in 10 Americans have experienced love at first sight.
  • Men (44%) are more likely than women (36%) to fall in love at first sight.

What is the success rate of relationships?

The success rate of relationships can vary depending on multiple factors. Check out some interesting statistics about it.

  • Women have a 68% chance of their first marriage lasting for 10 years.
  • Men have a 70% chance of their first marriage lasting for 10 years.
  • 58% of long distance relationships are successful.
  • There’s a 27% chance of a long distance relationship breaking up in the starting 6 months.
  • 30% of geographically close relationships can break within the first 6 months.
  • 10% of married couples started as long distance partners.

What are the statistics of relationships lasting?

When it comes to relationships, the question of success is a complex one. While some couples may define success as a lifetime of happiness and love, others may see it as simply making it through the ups and downs of life together.

Here are some interesting facts and figures about it:

  • On average, a relationship last 2 years and 9 months.
  • For people aged 18-34, the average length of a relationship is 3 months.
  • For people aged 35-54, the average length of a relationship is 4 years and 2 months.
  • For people over 55, the average length of a relationship is 11 years and 10 months.
  • 4.5 months is the average length of a long distance relationship.

What relationships lasted the longest?

There are several examples of relationships that have lasted for a long time. Some of the longest-known relationships include

  • The longest recorded marriage ever was 90 years and 291 days between the Indian couple Karam Chand and Kartari Chand.
  • The longest marriage according to the Guinness World Records lasted 86 years and 290 days between the US couple Herbert Fisher and Zelmyra Fisher.
  • The longest ongoing marriage happened in 1940 between Eugene Gladu and Dolores Gladu. They have been together for over 82 years.

What percentage of relationships fail?

When it comes to relationships, the question of failure is a sensitive one. In this article, we will explore the various ways in which the failure rate of relationships can be measured and understood.

Let’s take a look at some interesting facts and figures about it:

  • 70% of relationships between straight unmarried couples end in the first year.
  • There is a 42% chance of a long distance relationship breaking up.
  • 76% of relationships between same-sex unmarried couples break up in the first year.
  • 64% of Americans have had their long-term relationship break up.

How likely is a relationship to fail?

The likelihood of a relationship failing varies greatly depending on several factors. Some of the main factors that can increase the likelihood of a relationship failing include a lack of communication, lack of trust, lack of commitment, and a lack of compatibility.

  • The chance of breaking up reduces to only 20% after 5 years and 15% after 10 years for straight unmarried couples.
  • The chance of breaking up reduces to only 21% after 5 years and 10% after 10 years for same-sex unmarried couples.
  • There’s only a 5% chance of straight married couples breaking up in the first 8 years.

Why do most couples fall out of love?

Sometimes, people just aren’t meant for each other. The relationship goes on for a while but eventually ends up at some point due to several reasons.

According to Dr. Jeffrey Bernstein from Psychology Today, The reasons most people fall out of love can vary from communication issues to trust problems, not feeling appreciated, Toxic thoughts, and so on.

Not Feeling Appreciated:

Not Feeling appreciated is one of the biggest reasons for couples falling out of love. When a person feels like their efforts and feelings are not being acknowledged or reciprocated, it can lead to dissatisfaction and emotional distance.

High expectations

When one or both partners have unrealistic and unmet expectations, it can lead to disappointment and dissatisfaction. It can also create pressure and stress which could lead to a breakup.

Lack of Communication and Trust

According to BetterHealth.com Trust building and frequent communication is possibly the most important aspect of a relationship. In case communication starts getting seldom and the partners stop trusting each other, the end of the relationship might be near.


Sources


Average Breast Cup Size Statistics [2024 Data by Country, Age, BMI]

What’s the most common boob size out there? Does breast size vary by country, age, and body type? And what causes big breasts, anyway?

If you’ve been asking any of these questions, or anything related to breasts, you’ve come to the right place.

In the following article, we’ve searched through a pile of statistics, research papers, and scientific journals to bring you the most accurate and up-to-date numbers on average breast sizes, the world’s largest cup sizes, and everything else related to the size of breasts from around the world.

Let’s dive in!

average breast size statistics

Average Breast Size – Key Statistics

  • 56% of a woman’s breast size is inherited.
  • 26% of American women are unhappy with their breasts.
  • 16% of European women are unsatisfied with their size.
  • 54% of men and 60% of women prefer the look of an average-sized pair of breasts.
  • 70% of 2000 respondents say they are satisfied with their partner’s breast size.
  • An average B-cup breast weighs 448 grams or 0.98 pounds.
  • An average woman’s breasts make up roughly 3.5% of her total body fat.
  • Women in the United States and Europe are thought to have some of the biggest breasts.
  • On average, Southeast Asia and Central African women are believed to have the smallest breasts.
  • The average natural breast size ranges between an A and C cup based on the US bra size system.
  • 1% of the adult female population in North America has breast implants.
  • Some studies have found a link between larger breasts and women with higher IQs.
  • B cup is considered the most common natural breast size in the US.
  • Between 1992 and 2003, the average US cup size increased from 34B to 34DD.
  • Body mass index is linked to breast size.
  • Women with smaller waists and larger breast have been shown to have better fertility than women with larger waistlines and smaller breasts.
  • Women with either asymmetric breasts or those who aren’t satisfied with their bust size are more likely to suffer from poor self-esteem and other mental health problems.
  • 12.4% of all women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • There is a link between smaller breast size and an increased risk of cancer.
  • And yet another study concluded breast size as a positive predictor of breast cancer in postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79, who were particularly lean when younger.
  • Globally, breast augmentation is the most common procedure, accounting for more than 17% of all plastic surgeries.
  • Gigantomastia is a rare medical condition that causes breasts to become extremely large.

What Is The Most Common Size Of Breasts?

Breast size varies drastically from one woman to another.

It’s essential to understand the link between size and how women perceive themselves, others, and how they are perceived.

Therefore, because each pair of breasts is unique and size varies so much between women, no single measure can be considered “common” or “normal.”

Also, we found that:

  • 80% of women are likely to wear a bra with the wrong size cup due to taking improper measurements or buying a bra based on chest size rather than cup size.

In other words, many women in the subsequent studies may have reported their size based on their bra rather than their actual measurements.

What Is The Average Natural Breast Cup Size?

  • The average natural breast size ranges between an A and C cup based on the US bra size system.
  • A B cup is considered the most common natural breast size in the US.
  • Between 1992 and 2003, the average US cup size increased from 34B to 34DD, likely linked to an increase in obesity and breast augmentation surgeries performed nationwide.
  • On average, women in Italy, Spain, and Germany wear a B cup.
  • On average, women in the UK, Poland, and France measure as a C cup.

But what about the smallest bra size? Or the biggest cup size in bras?

  • 28AA is often the smallest bra size available from most retailers.
  • Some specialist shops can produce bras as small as a AAA cup size.
  • Bra sizes range from A to J or K, depending on the measurement system used.
  • There are six different bra sizing systems used around the world.
  • Most women with breasts larger than a D or E cup should consult a specialist bra maker to obtain a bra that fits properly and provides adequate support.

Are Small And Large Breasts Normal?

  • Breasts come in all sorts of different shapes and sizes.
  • Small and large breasts are entirely normal so long as they do not cause unusual pain or discomfort and do not show any signs of disfiguration, hard lumps or nodules, or other cancer symptoms.

What Causes Extremely Large Breasts?

Breast size is most accurately linked and predicted by a woman’s genetics. However, other factors can cause huge breasts.

For example:

  • Gigantomastia is a rare medical condition that causes breasts to become extremely large.
  • Women with gigantomastia have more than 5 pounds of breast tissue or breast tissue that equals more than 3% of their total weight.
  • Only 300 cases of gigantomastia have ever been recorded.
  • Body mass index is linked to breast size.
  • Women generally have larger breasts in countries where obesity runs rampant.
  • Hormonal changes, medications, and autoimmune diseases can cause larger bust sizes.

Are Bigger Breasts Healthier?

No conclusive studies support the idea that larger breasts are healthier.

However, there are some surprising links between breast size, IQ, fertility, and mental health.

  • Some studies have found a link between larger breasts and women with higher IQs.
  • Women with smaller waists and larger ta-tas have been shown to have better fertility than women with larger waistlines and smaller breasts.
  • Women with either asymmetric breasts or those who aren’t satisfied with their bust size are more likely to suffer from poor self-esteem and other mental health problems.

Are There Any Links Between Breast Size And Breast Cancer?

An estimated 12.4% of all women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point.

And although cancer treatments have come a long way, and recovery is possible, being diagnosed with cancer of the breasts is a severe concern for many women.

To date, no conclusive studies link breast size with an increased risk of cancer. However, studies have sometimes shown contradicting results.

For example:

  • One study found no statistical correlation between breast size in Chinese women and the risk of developing cancer.
  • And in obese women, there has also been no link between cup size and breast cancer.
  • However, other studies have concluded that a link exists between smaller breast size and an increased risk of cancer.
  • And yet another study concluded breast size as a positive predictor of breast cancer in postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79, who were particularly lean when younger.

Regardless, factors other than size can lead to an increased risk of breast cancer.

And today, in many parts of the world, breast cancer is consistently the most common cancer in women.

  • Breast size is not included on most causational or cancer risk lists.
  • However, there is a link between breast density, not size, and increased cancer risk.
  • In the United States, between 2011 and 2015, 126 of 100,000 were newly diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • In 2018, an estimated 40,920 women died from breast cancer in the United States.
  • Menstruation age, family medical history, age, BMI, alcohol and tobacco use, exercise, diet, and even working night shift have been linked to the early onset of breast cancer.
  • There is no link between abortion and breast cancer.
  • Premenopausal women who don’t wear a bra are 50% less likely to develop breast cancer.

What Is A Good Breast Cup Size?

Because of the variety of breast sizes in the world, what is considered a good size boils down to preference.

What one person considers a reasonable size will almost always differ from what the next person thinks.

However:

  • 74% of American women are happy with their breasts.
  • 84% of European women are satisfied with their size.
  • 54% of men and 60% of women prefer the look of an average-sized pair of breasts.
  • Roughly 50% of men and women say they prefer a C cup.
  • Just under 20% of men and 26% of women prefer a B cup.
  • Only 18% of men and 14% of women prefer a D cup.
  • Less than 1% of men and women prefer larger, DDD breasts.
  • Ideal size often varies significantly from any country’s average breast size.
  • Study participants in Poland and Romania say they prefer breasts one cup smaller than the national average.

What Is The Average Weight Of A Woman’s Breast?

  • On average, a single A cup-sized breast weighs just over 236 grams or about 0.52 pounds.
  • An average B-cup breast weighs 448 grams or 0.98 pounds.
  • C cups, on average, weigh about 531 grams, or 1.17 pounds each.
  • D cups, on average, weigh 760 grams each, or 1.67 pounds.
  • E cups can weigh as much as 1 kilogram per breast.

What Percentage Of A Woman’s Weight Is In Breasts?

  • An average woman’s breasts make up roughly 3.5% of her total body fat.
  • At most, 12% of a woman’s sex-specific weight can be attributed to her breasts.

Does Breast Size Matter?

In short, breast size doesn’t matter.

However, size is often closely linked to a woman’s quality of life, how she perceives herself and other women, and how her partners see her.

  • 70% of 2000 respondents say they are satisfied with their partner’s breast size.
  • 9% say they are dissatisfied with their partner’s bust size.
  • 20% say they have a neutral opinion toward their partner’s breasts.

Do Cup Sizes Vary By Country?

As we’ve seen above, women from different nationalities have different average breast sizes.

And although much about a woman’s bust size is defined by her genetics, the link between bust size and body weight is one of the primary reasons for the drastic differences we see in size from one country to the next.

For example:

  • Women in regions such as Southeast Asia and Central Africa are generally more slender, have lower BMIs, and have smaller average breast sizes.
  • The body burns more calories in warmer regions to keep its core temperature down.
  • This results in more fat being burned, and less fatty tissue is allowed to accumulate on a woman’s chest.

What Country Has The Biggest Average Breast Size?

  • Women in the United States and Europe are thought to have some of the biggest breasts.
  • On average, Southeast Asia and Central African women are believed to have the smallest breasts.
CountryCup SizeAverage Body Mass Index
United StatesC29
United KingdomC27.1
VenezuelaB-C26.9
ColombiaB-C26.7
SwedenB-C25.4
NetherlandsB-C25.3
CanadaB-C26.7
GeorgiaB27.7
AustraliaB26.8
Bosnia and HerzegovinaB25.3

Breast Size Frequently Asked Questions – FAQ

How Common Is Breast Augmentation Surgery?

  • In 2021, The Aesthetic Society reported:
    • A total of 365,000 breast augmentation procedures.
    • One hundred forty-eight thousand women had implants removed and replaced.
    • Seventy-one thousand women had implants removed and not replaced.
  • Globally, breast augmentation is the most common procedure, accounting for more than 17% of all plastic surgeries.
  • Between one and two million women in North America have breast implants, representing roughly 1% of the adult female population.

Does Breast Size Increase After Marriage?

  • No studies show any conclusive evidence that breasts increase in size after marriage.
  • However, breasts increase in size when a woman is pregnant or breastfeeding, which may be where the myth came from.

Can Push-Up Bras Increase Breast Size?

  • Push-up bras do not increase breast size permanently.

What Causes Small Breast Size?

  • Women with smaller bodies and lower BMIs generally have smaller breasts.
  • Genetics is the most significant contributing factor to breast size.
  • Roughly 56% of a woman’s breast size is inherited.

Do Breasts Get Bigger As You Age?

  • Breast development begins when a woman first enters puberty.
  • After puberty, a woman’s breast size generally remains the same throughout adulthood.
  • However, hormonal changes, medications, and other factors can cause breasts to change in both shape and size over time.

Does Breast Size Increase After Intimacy?

  • Due to hormonal changes and increased blood flow, a woman’s breasts may swell in size when aroused and temporarily after intimacy.

Do Women’s Breasts Get Bigger With Weight?

  • Studies have shown a link between women with higher body fat percentages and women with larger breasts.

Do Women’s Breasts Get Bigger With Exercise?

  • Although the muscles below the breasts may grow, exercising does not contribute to increased cup size.
  • Exercising can lower a woman’s BMI, which can cause breasts to become more petite and lean.

By Popular Demand: How to Increase Breast Size

Here are six methods that have the potential to increase breast size.

Method 1: Natural Creams, Gels And Pills

Breast growth creams, gels and pills,  are widely available without prescription on the open market. The majority of these supplements contain natural ingredients that claim to stimulate estrogen production, and plump out the fatty tissue of breasts. Estrogen is the hormone responsible for producing breast growth in teenage girls, and regulates hormones throughout their reproductive lives. When estrogen, and to a lesser extent, testosterone, fail, breast growth does not occur.

Natural creams, gels, and pill supplements are not classed as medicines, because they do not induce glandular changes which could increase the chances of tumor development. If they did cause glandular changes on this scale, they would be subject to rigorous medical tests before being made available to the public. As natural creams, gels and pills are simply supplements, they rely on commercial testing by their manufacturers. There is no scientific evidence that suggests natural supplements can cause breast enlargement, although there is lots of subjective evidence produced by independent manufacturers.

Natural breast-enhancing supplements often contain ingredients such as fennel, black cohosh, saw palmetto, wild yam and kava, which have been used in traditional medicine for centuries to treat women’s illnesses, such as menopause. It is important to check each brand for claims and ingredients before use, so there is a clear awareness of what the body is absorbing internally and externally.

There are no noted side effects associated with natural creams, gels and pills, although breast feeding and pregnant women are advised against their use, as effects on unborn children are unknown. This warning is standard with all alternative medicines, and should always be adhered to.

Method 2: Medications

  • Contraceptive Pill

Medical research indicates that some medications can increase breast size. Although no medicine exists solely to produce bigger breasts, the contraceptive pill lists breast growth as a side effect

The contraceptive pill, or the ‘pill’, is used to prevent unwanted pregnancy, and is prescribed widely. Contraceptive pills are dispensed by a doctor after a medical examination that ensures suitability, as there are other potential side-effects, such as nausea, weight gain, migraines and decreased libido. Although the pill is medically proven to increase breast size in some women, a desire for breast growth is not necessarily the right reason to take it. The contraceptive pill is a medication that alters body functions, so taking it should be carefully thought through.

  • Hormone Replacement Therapy

Other medications that can increase breast size are various estrogen therapies, sometimes known as Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). HRT is doctor prescribed treatment for menopausal women that ease the symptoms of hot flushing, vaginal dryness, and decreasing libido. The medication does this by supplementing new estrogens to replace those that have fallen in number with the aging process.

Menopause is a natural loss of fertility. The arrival of new estrogen hormones in a woman’s body can stimulate breast growth, sexual appetite and eradicate vaginal dryness, returning it to a younger state. Therefore is it unlikely that a doctor would prescribe HRT to a woman unhappy with breast size.

Method 3: Surgery

There is no argument that breast augmentation works, as bigger breasts are clearly evident after surgery has been performed. However, surgery comes with risks. A breast enlargement, or simpler breast uplift, is a surgical procedure requiring a general anaesthetic. Anaesthetic comes with its own risks, alongside any potential issues with the breast surgery itself.

  • Saline versus Silicone

When surgery is considered an option, a choice will need to be made between silicone and saline implants. Saline implants are inserted into the breast, and once in place they are filled with sterile water, whereas silicone implants are filled with silicone gel before insertion into the breast. Many women believe that silicone implants feel more natural to the touch, because silicone gel mimics the texture of fat.

  • Safety Concerns

Insertion of a foreign body into the breasts can result in rejection. This risk is lower with a reputable surgeon, but with that safety comes a high financial cost.

Another risk is scarring of the internal tissues and external skin of the breast, which may change the shape of the implants. This can result in an uneven bust and breasts with lumps. Long term breast pain can also be an issue with implants.

  • Risk of Rupture

A saline implant rupture would produce a deflated breast, with the saline water absorbing into the body. A silicone rupture would be harder to identify, and may lead to a slow leakage of silicone into the body. It is not easy to identify a silicone rupture, and an MRI scan would be needed to confirm the diagnosis.

All the risks listed above would require further surgery for correction. A doctor should always be consulted about breast augmentation, as they may have details of reputable surgeons. Independent doctor recommendation is an obvious benefit to invasive cosmetic procedures, which can be risky.

Method 4: Diet and Exercise

Diet and exercise are time-consuming ways to potentially increase breast size, but they are the healthiest and cheapest options available.

  • Diet

Thinner women may find that they generally have smaller breasts than their heavier counterparts. This is due to breast composition, as breasts are largely made up of fatty materials. Therefore, gaining weight may increase breast size. It’s not possible to ‘spot enlarge’ though, and extra weight may be evenly absorbed in a spread across the body. Conversely, dieting will often shrink breasts, as the fatty breast tissues are reduced in size.

There are certain foods which have been claimed to increase breast size too. These are foods that are believed by some to boost estrogen, and are often found in the natural supplements mentioned in Method 1. Alongside those supplements already listed are soya milk, beans, and seeds, which are reported to contain high levels of naturally occurring phyto-estrogens.

  • Pectorals

Personal trainers and fitness instructors claim that the right type of exercise can increase breast size. This method is based around enlargement of the pectoral muscles.

Pectoral muscles sit behind the breast. When a women puts her hands together and presses, she will feel the pectoral muscles or ‘pecs’ moving. As with all regular weight-bearing exercise, constant use of the pectorals will cause them to increase in bulk. The pectorals then push the breast forward, creating larger breasts.

The best exercise to increase pectoral mass is to lie flat, with knees bent, and arms apart mimicking wings. Slowly bringing hands together above the breasts will flex the pectorals. Start slow, and build up to holding weights. Pectoral exercise can also strengthen ligaments which support the breasts, which can result in breast lift.

  • Posture

Posture makes a big difference, not only to backache, but to self esteem and overall body shape. Having good posture can also make breasts appear larger as they are pushed forward. When stomach muscles are pulled in and shoulders are pressed back, the breast moves forwards and upwards giving the illusion of larger breasts.

Overall, diet and exercise may help increase breast size but only if high cardio (fat burning) exercise is avoided and muscle mass in the upper body is increased.

Method 5: Clothing

A lot of breast enhancement can be achieved with a good fitting bra and clever clothing choices.

  • The Right Bra

Finding the right bra can be life-changing. Many women wear the wrong size, simply because they do not know how a bra should fit, or because they have worn a particular size for years. Breast shapes change as women age, and bra-fitting by a trained advisor should take place at least one a year, and certainly before new bras are purchased.

  • How should bra fit?

Firstly the wearer should forget their size, and be measured. Most large department stores offer this service.

When fitting a new bra, the wearer should ensure that the rounded part that conceals and supports the breast (called the cup), should cover nearly all the skin, so there is no over-spill. The hooked back should not ride up during movement, and should remain in place so the band is level around the rib cage. Straps should be lengthened to suit, and they should not dig in. All breast weight should be supported by the back size, not the shoulder straps.

Once fitted with the correct-sized bra, breasts look immeasurably better. They are not necessarily bigger, but without overspill and too tight straps, breasts sit well. This transformation can cure backache and improve posture.

  • Push-up bras

Push-up bras force the breasts closer together, and push them upwards and outwards. This makes the most of smaller breasts without adding volume. The straps of a push-up bra should be wide and flat, otherwise they pull on a woman’s shoulders, potentially leading to backache.

  • Padded Bra

A padded bra adds volume to the breast area, rather than manipulating the breasts themselves. Padded bras have a spongy cup that can add up to a cup size, and give the illusion of a bigger bust.

Some manufacturers produce push-up padded bras which are a good choice for those with very small breasts. A good bra can transform a figure and make it possible to avoid surgery. Although push-up and padded bras are a good option for increasing bust size, they must also fit correctly.

  • Dressing tricks

Certain types of clothing can give the illusion of bigger breasts, and when coupled with a well fitting bra, this alone can achieve the bust that smaller-chested women are looking for.

  • Horizontal stripes

When worn on top, horizontal stripes widen the bust area – this is due to the viewer’s eye being naturally drawn across the chest area. Vertical stripes give the opposite impression and are best avoided by women looking to increase breast size.

  • Embellishments

Frills, patterns, textures, and long necklaces can add volume when worn across the chest area. Logos give the impression of extra size too, as do scarves and double-breasted coats.

  • Block colour

A helpful clothing trick for the illusion of bigger breasts is to wear black, or a darker colour, on the bottom half, with a bright colour on the top half. This is especially good for pear-shaped women looking to balance their shape. This is because bright colours attract the eye and give the impression there is more happening.

Method 6: Breast Vacuum Pumps

Vacuum pumps work on the principle of tissue expansion. The suction force produced by breast pumps pulls blood into the tissues, and claims to gently increase volume. This claimed expansion happens slowly over a period of time.

Vacuum breast pumps come in the form of two domes which are placed over the breasts, and an attached pumping device, which removes air from the domes – pulling breast tissue outwards.

Electronic and manual vacuum breast pumps are available. The more expensive electronic options include a computer, which applies pressure or removes it as needed. Manual hand held pumps are more basic, but they are cheaper and widely available.

Breast pumps can be time-consuming. Most require the user to wear them for 10 hours a day over a period of several weeks before results are noticeable. For those who work during the day, this may be impossible. An option is to wear them overnight, but many find them too uncomfortable to sleep in.

Manufacturers of breast pumps claim they increase skin elasticity, and improve blood circulation which in turn drains the lymph nodes. They are an option for women unwilling to take pills or use creams. However no medical scientific evidence supports their claims.

Women who are looking to increase their breast size have more choice than ever before. Expensive and risky surgery is not the only option, there are other methods that claim to produce bigger breasts, and it may be wise to try these out before embarking on a surgical procedure.

Whatever the chosen option, all risks and side effects should be thoroughly investigated, and if any doubt remains, a medical practitioner should be consulted.

Sources


How Many Pregnancies Are Unplanned? [2024 Data] – USA & Global Report

Unplanned pregnancies can have significant emotional, financial, and physical impacts on individuals and families. They can result from a variety of factors, such as contraceptive failure, lack of access to birth control, and risky sexual behavior.

Understanding the rates and demographics of unintended pregnancies can help policymakers, healthcare providers, and individuals make informed decisions and take steps to prevent unintended pregnancies.

In this article, we will explore the rates of unwanted pregnancy and its potential causes, as well as the potential consequences.

unplanned pregnancies statistics

Key Unplanned Pregnancy Stats

  • 44% of all pregnancies in New York are unintended (highest in the USA)
  • 26% of all pregnancies in Utah are unintended (lowest in the USA)
  • California of 273,370 unplanned pregnancies per year (highest in the USA)
  • Vermont has 2,570 unintended pregnancies per year (lowest in the USA)
  • The number of unplanned pregnancies in the world is 121 million per year
  • Around half of all pregnancies in the world are unintended
  • Among developed countries, the United States has the highest rate of a unplanned pregnancies at 28.5%.
  • Unplanned pregnancy rates are higher among women whose income is less than the federal poverty level.
  • At 91 per 1000 women, Sub-Saharan Africa had the highest rate of unintended pregnancies.
  • More than 60% of unplanned pregnancies end in abortion.
  • There were 73 million abortions per year from 2015 to 2019.
  • For every 1000 unintended pregnancies, there are 74% resulting in abortion in East and Southeast Asia.
  • Countries restricting abortion have the highest rate of unintended pregnancy.
  • The unplanned pregnancy rate has declined from 79 to 64 per 1000 women globally since 1990.
  • There are 2.6 million unwanted pregnancies per year in the US (for women aged 15-49)
  • 34% of unplanned pregnancies in the United States result in abortion annually.
  • Out of 21 million teen pregnancies (aged 15-19) annually between 2015 and 2019, 50% of them were unwanted in Low and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs).
  • 55% of the unplanned pregnancies among teens end in abortion.
  • Cohabiting women, women between the age of 18 and 24 have higher unintended pregnancy rates.

Defining Pregnancy Desires

The desire for pregnancy refers to a person’s wish or longing to become pregnant and have a child. This desire can be strong and deeply felt, and can be influenced by a variety of factors, including personal and cultural values, relationships, and life circumstances.

It is a very personal experience and can vary greatly from person to person. Some people may feel a strong desire for pregnancy from a young age, while others may discover this desire later in life.

Unintended Pregnancy in the United States

The US has the highest rate of unwanted or unplanned pregnancies among developed countries. How many unwanted pregnancies per year in the us?

As a result, there are millions of unwanted pregnancies each year. There are 2.6 million unplanned pregnancies annually in the US. And the rate doesn’t seem to go down much.

Unintended Pregnancy Rates by State


U.S. StateUnwanted pregnancies (yearly)Unwanted pregnancies % (compared to all pregnancies)% of unwanted pregnancies ending in abortion% of unwanted pregnancies ending in birth
California273,370 38 46 42
Texas203,950392659
New York170,080445731
Florida142,640 41 46 42
Illinois88,080404146
Pennsylvania79,260394146
Georgia78,940413948
New Jersey75,630445929
Ohio75,560402660
North Carolina70,120413452
Michigan60,130374146
Maryland51,100445037
Virginia50,250353848
Tennessee47,140432263
Arizona41,790 37 30 56
Washington41,220334146
Indiana38,570 35 25 60
Massachusetts36,330344938
Louisiana35,930432461
Missouri35,090362659
South Carolina31,420 39 34 52
Alabama31,400402362
Colorado31,070353452
Minnesota29,280313353
Wisconsin26,340312758
Oklahoma23,470361966
Oregon22,490363849
Kentucky22,340312065
Nevada21,930 41 42 45
Connecticut21,200385334
Mississippi19,890 40 23 62
Arkansas19,190391867
Utah15,850261867
Kansas15,440322263
Iowa13,950282561
New Mexico11,140343353
Nebraska9,490282363
Hawaii8,570353651
Idaho8,530 30 20 65
West Virginia7,940322857
Delaware6,490404046
Rhode Island6,370394939
New Hampshire5,270314245
Maine5,260313750
Montana4,870312956
South Dakota4,420291669
North Dakota4,290312264
Alaska4,270303254
Wyoming2,990332362
Vermont2,570324245
District of Columbiauuuu

Demographic Differences

Demographic differences refer to the ways in which rates of unplanned pregnancy differ among different groups of people based on factors such as age, race, ethnicity, and socio-economic status.

For example, studies have shown that accidental pregnancy rates are generally higher among younger people, especially those in their teens and early 20s, and among people who are of lower socio-economic status or who have less access to education and contraception.

Unplanned pregnancy rates may also vary among different racial and ethnic groups, with some groups having higher rates than others.

Following are a few unwanted pregnancy statistics:

  • Women having an income less than 200% of the federal poverty level have the highest rate of unplanned pregnancy.
  • Women between the age of 18 and 24 have higher unplanned pregnancy rates.
  • Cohabiting and women of color also have a higher rate of unintended pregnancy.
  • College graduates, women with higher income, white women, and married women have a lower rate of unwanted pregnancy.
  • Women having lower incomes than 100% of the poverty had an unplanned pregnancy rate of 112 per 1000 in 2011.
  • In 2011, women aged between 20 and 24 had the highest unplanned pregnancy rate at 81 per 1000.
  • At 73 per 1000, the women not having any school degree had the highest unplanned pregnancy rate in 2011.

Unplanned Pregnancy by Age

The age of an individual can impact their risk of experiencing an unplanned pregnancy. This can be due to a variety of factors, including contraceptive use, sexual behavior, and access to reproductive healthcare.

Here are some interesting statistics related to unplanned pregnancy by age:

  • Women between the age of 18 and 24 have the highest rates of unintended pregnancy.
  • Women aged 18-24 had 81 per 1000 unintended pregnancy rates in 2011. The highest for any age group.
  • For women aged 18-19 the unintended pregnancy rate reduced by 20% during 2008-11.
  • In 2018, the unplanned pregnancy rate for women aged 15-19 decreased by almost 50% as compared to 2008.
  • For women between 40 and 44 years, the unplanned pregnancy rate is 48%.

Teen Pregnancy Rates

The teen pregnancy rate can be measured per 1,000 women in this age group, and it is used as an indicator of reproductive health and well-being for this population.

In the United States, the teen pregnancy rate has declined significantly in recent decades, thanks in part to improved access to education, contraception, and other reproductive health services.

However, the rate of teen pregnancy in the US is still higher than in many other developed countries, and it remains a public health concern because teenage pregnancies can have negative consequences for both the mother and the child.

Here are some facts and figures related to the Teen pregnancy rates:

  • Teen unplanned pregnancy rates have reduced by 50% over the last decade.
  • For sexually active women aged between 15 and 19, the unplanned pregnancy rates are the highest for any age group.
  • There was a 20% decline in the unintended pregnancy rate for women aged 18-19 during 2008-11.
  • In the same period, the unplanned pregnancy rate for women aged 15-17 declined by 44%.
  • In 2019, in LMICs, there were almost 50% unplanned teen pregnancies out of the 21 million.
  • 55% of teen pregnancies end in abortion.
  • Teen mothers have higher chances of systemic infections, eclampsia, and puerperal endometritis.

Unplanned pregnancies in your 20s

Pregnancy rates among women in their 20s vary depending on a number of factors, including geographical location, socio-economic status, and access to education and reproductive health care.

In general, pregnancy rates are highest among women in their early 20s and decline as women get older.

Following are some unplanned pregnancy statistics for women in their 20s.

  • Women aged 18-24 have the highest unplanned pregnancy rates.
  • Women aged 20-24 had an unintended pregnancy rate of 81 per 1000 in 2011.
  • For women in their 20s, almost 1/3rd of the pregnancies during 2001-08 were unintended.
  • Out of the 1.95 million pregnancies for unmarried women in their 20s during 2001-08, 69% were unplanned.
  • In this period, 73% of the unplanned pregnancies were for women between 20-24 years old.
  • For women between 25 and 29 years, the percentage of unwanted pregnancies was 63.

Unplanned Pregnancies by Ethnicity

Unplanned pregnancies can occur among people of all racial and ethnic backgrounds, but the rates of unplanned pregnancy can vary among different groups.

In the United States, studies have shown that unplanned pregnancy rates are generally higher among certain racial and ethnic minority groups, such as African Americans and Latinx populations, compared to non-Hispanic Whites.

Following are some unplanned pregnancy statistics by ethnicity to show for.

  • Women of color have a higher unplanned pregnancy rate than white women.
  • In 2011, non-Hispanic black women had more than two times the unintended pregnancy rate of non-Hispanic white women (79 vs 33 per 1000 women).
  • 50% of black women wanted to have an abortion after an unplanned pregnancy. The highest rate for other ethnic and racial groups having 36-40% rate.
  • In 2006, non-Latina black and Latina women had twice the unplanned pregnancy rate as compared to non-Latina white women.

Outcomes Of Unintended Pregnancy

Unintended pregnancies can have a range of negative consequences for both the mother and the child.

Here are a few unplanned pregnancy statistics showing the outcomes of unintended pregnancy:

  • In the United States, 34% of unplanned pregnancies ended in abortion during 2015-19.
  • This was a decrease from 2011 when 41% of unintended pregnancies resulted in abortion.
  • 22 per 100 women – The unintended birth rate among women aged 15-49, in 2011.
  • About 73% of unintended pregnancies resulted in abortion in Eastern and Southeast Asia during 2015-19. The highest for any region.
  • Unintended pregnancy can result in low birth weight, psychological or physical abuse, more risk of parental stress and postpartum depression, and a shorter breastfeeding period.

Preventing Unintended Pregnancy

To prevent unintended pregnancies, it is important to use effective contraception consistently and correctly. This can include options such as male and female condoms, oral contraceptives, implants, and long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) like IUDs and hormonal injections.

Access to reproductive healthcare, including family planning services and contraception, can also help reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy.

Having said that, the following are some of the unplanned pregnancy statistics related to prevention.

  • Around 95% of unplanned pregnancies happen to women who either are not using contraception or using it incorrectly or inconsistently.
  • In 2014, publicly funded family planning services helped almost 2 million women avoid unplanned pregnancies.
  • Almost 700,000 abortions and 300,000 miscarriages were saved by family planning services in 2014.
  • $13.6 billion were saved in 2010 due to family planning services saving women from unintended pregnancies nationwide.
  • The usage of LARCs in place of short-acting contraceptive methods can prevent unintended pregnancies notably.
  • Talking with male partners about the issue can also help to avoid it.

Trends in Unintended Pregnancy

Unplanned pregnancy rates can vary over time and among different population groups.

In many developed countries, including the United States, unintended pregnancy rates have declined over time, thanks in part to improvements in access to education, contraception, and reproductive health care.

That’s exactly what the unplanned pregnancy statistics show below.

  • During 2015-19, the unplanned pregnancy rate had declined from 79 to 64 per 1000 women globally, since 1990-94. This resulted in an 18% decrease.
  • The rate of abortion due to unplanned pregnancy has increased from 51% to 61% globally.
  • Europe and Northern America saw the highest change of -47% as the unintended pregnancy per 1000 women decreased from 67 to 35.
  • Eastern & Southeast Asia and Australia & New Zealand had the lowest change in unintended pregnancy rates of –4% and -9%, respectively. Oceania (excluding Australia and New Zealand) also had a –4% change.
  • 72% of unplanned pregnancies resulted in abortion during 2015-19 in Central and South Asia which is a +59% change as compared to 1990-94.
  • The rate of abortion from unplanned pregnancies decreased quite a bit from 69% (1990-94) to 49% (2015-19) in Europe and Northern America. It was a -29% change.

How Many Pregnancies End in Abortion?

The percentage of unintended pregnancies that end in abortion can vary depending on a number of factors, including access to abortion services, cultural and societal attitudes towards abortion, and individual beliefs and values.

Abortion can be a safe and effective way to end an unintended pregnancy, and access to abortion services is an important component of reproductive health care.

Following are statistics for unintended pregnancy abortion rates globally:

  • The abortion rate decreased by 48% in the US from 1990 to 2019.
  • During 2015-2019, 886,000 unintended pregnancies out of almost 2.6 million ended in abortion.
  • Out of 121 million unintended pregnancies annually, 61% resulted in abortion globally
  • There were 73 million abortions every year from 2015 to 2019.
  • About 73% of unintended pregnancies resulted in abortion in Eastern and Southeast Asia during 2015-19. The highest for any region.
  • Central & Southern Asia had the second highest abortion rate from unintended pregnancies at 72%.
  • Northern America had the lowest abortion rate at 34% and it was followed by Sub-Saharan Africa and Africa at 37% and 41% respectively.
  • Europe, Latin America, Oceania, Western Asia & Northern Africa, and Europe & North America had 56%, 47%, 43%, 60%, and 49% abortion rates from unintended pregnancies, respectively.


Sources


Lgbtq+ Statistics [2024 Data] Facts, Discrimination & More

Gay, lesbian, non-binary, queer, transgender…

Today, gender is no longer confined to the traditional gender roles of male and female.

And for many, the growing LGBTQ+ community has made it easier, safer, and more accepted than ever before to be who they are.

In the following article, we’ve searched through dozens of studies, papers, and research articles to bring you the most up-to-date facts and figures surrounding today’s LBGTQ+ community.

Let’s jump in!

lgbtq statistics facts

LGBTQ+ Key Statistics

Population Size And Generations

  • 5% of Americans identify as LGBTQ+
  • 54% of LGBTQ+ people are bisexual.
  • 3.1% of Americans are bisexual.
  • 1.4% of Americans are gay.
  • 11.7% of the LGBTQ+ community are lesbians.
  • Less than 1% of Americans are lesbians.
  • 11.3% of LGBTQ+ members are transgender.
  • 1.4 million Americans identify as transgender.
  • 4% of Californians over the age of 18 are part of the LGBTQ+ community.
  • 16% of Gen Z identifies as LGBTQ+.
  • 72% of the US Gen Z population are bisexual.
  • 9.1% of the US Millennial population are LGBTQ+ members.
  • 50% of US Millennials are bisexual.
  • 3.8% of US Generation X are LGBTQ+.
  • 2% of US Baby Boomers are LGBTQ+.
  • 1 in 3 Millennials is non-binary.
  • 8% of those over 45 are non-binary.
  • Women are 138% more likely to be bisexual.
  • There are between 1,320 to 15,500 transgender individuals in the US military.

Poverty And Homelessness

  • 29% of US transgender individuals live in poverty.
  • LGBTQ+ adults are more than 200% more likely to live below the poverty line.
  • LGBTQ+ youth are 120% more likely to experience poverty.

Healthcare

  • One-third of transgender people need to educate their physicians about gender identity.
  • 15% of US LGBTQ+ members have avoided medical treatment due to discrimination.
  • 73% of LGBTQ+ youth experience anxiety.
  • More than half of all LGBTQ+ youth experience depression.
  • 30% of transgender people avoid medical treatment due to a lack of understanding surrounding gender identity.
  • 69% of new HIV diagnoses are non-white gay and bisexual men.
  • 40% of LGBTQ+ between 60 to 80 say their doctor does not know about their gender or sexual identity.

Workplace Acceptance And Discrimination

  • 93% of Americans say gay people should have equal rights in the workplace.
  • 95% of Fortune 500 companies have implemented non-discrimination policies for LGBTQ+ people.
  • 71% of Fortune 500 companies offer transgender-inclusive benefits.
  • 15% of LGBTQ+ women feel their sexual identity will negatively impact their career.
  • 30% of LGBTQ+ men feel their sexuality will negatively impact their job.
  • 40% of LGBTQ+ adults have experienced discrimination by a friend or family member.
  • 58% of LGBTQ+ adults have been the target of slurs.
  • 54% of US LGBTQ+ members have hidden a relationship.
  • 30% of LGBTQ+ adults have been physically threatened or attacked.
  • Forty-four transgender people were killed in the US in 2020.

Suicide And Self-Harm

  • 12.5% of LGBTQ+ people aged 18 to 24 have attempted suicide.
  • 50% of all transgender people contemplate suicide.
  • 45% of LGBTQ+ youth contemplate suicide.
  • 14% of LGBTQ+ youth have attempted suicide.
  • 21% of pansexuals have attempted suicide within the past year.

Religion

  • 84% say the Muslim faith is unfriendly toward the LGBTQ+ community.
  • 10% of LGBTQ+ adults say the Jewish or Protestant religions are LGBTQ+ friendly.
  • 48% of the LGBTQ+ community have no religious affiliations.

Race And Ethnicity

  • 17% of African-American LGBTQ+ youth say they’ve been physically threatened or injured.
  • 76% of Indigenous LGBTQ+ youth experience discrimination.

Relationship, Marriage, And Family

  • 20% of same-sex couples have at least one child.
  • 20% of LGBTQ+ respondents have been physically assaulted by their partner.
  • 75% did not report the incident to the police.
  • 58% of LGBTQ+ say the issue of same-sex marriage should be a priority.
  • 16% of LGBTQ+ adults are married.
  • 66% of lesbians are in a committed relationship.
  • 40% of gay men are in committed relationships.

What Does LGBTQ+ Mean?

  • LGBTQ+ stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and others.
  • The term LGBT was first introduced and widely used in the 1990s to denote anyone who did not identify as cisgender or heterosexual.
  • Other variants of the term, including LGBT, LGBT+, LGBTQ+, and LGBTQA+, are occasionally used to identify the same population.

 

How Many Sexes Are There?

When it comes to gender and sexuality, it’s no longer a male or female world.

More than ever, people are coming out as a wide variety of genders and sexualities, ranging from men who are attracted to other men to women who don’t discriminate and love others no matter how they identify, whether that’s as a man, woman, or anything else in between.

Fortunately, more than 90% of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender adults say they believe society is more accepting of them than in the past.

However, there are still many people who are uncomfortable or who don’t know about the wide range of genders and sexuality that exist.

Below, we’ve listed some of the most common genders and sexualities and their definitions.

Sexuality/GenderDescription    
HeterosexualCommonly used to describe people who are attracted to the opposite sex/gender.
CisgenderPeople who identify with the gender they were assigned at birth.
TransgenderPeople who identify with a gender other than the one they were assigned at birth.
TransexualAn individual who has had gender reassignment surgery.
HomosexualPeople who are attracted to others with the same gender as their own.
GayPeople who identify as male that are attracted to other males.
LesbianPeople who identify as female and are attracted to other females.
BisexualPeople who are attracted to more than one gender or sexuality
PansexualThose who do not lose based on gender or sexuality.
AsexualPeople who experience virtually no sexual attraction to others.
DemisexualThose who only experience sexual attraction after they’ve formed a solid emotional bond with another person.
PolyamorousPeople who consensually engage in open relationships with multiple individuals
Queer or Gender fluidUsed for people who do not identify as heterosexual, homesexual, or cisgender.
AllyAny individual who supports members of the LGBTQ+ community.

LGBTQ+ Population: How Many People Identify As LGBTQ+?

  • 5.6% of Americans identify themselves as part of the LGBTQ+ community.
  • This number is up more than 24% from the 4.5% of Americans who identify as LGBTQ+ members in 2017.
  • On the other hand, 86.7% of Americans say they are heterosexual.

How Many Americans Are Bisexual?

  • Most American LGBTQ+ people say they are bisexual.
  • More than 54% of the LGBTQ+ community say they are bisexual.
  • 3.1% of Americans identify as bisexual.

How Many Americans Are Gay?

  • 24.5% of the LGBTQ+ community identifies as gay.
  • 1.4% of Americans identify as gay.

How Many Americans Are Lesbian?

  • 11.7% of the LGBTQ+ population identify as lesbian.
  • 0.7% of Americans identify as lesbian.

How Many Americans Are Transgender?

  • 11.3% of the LGBTQ+ community say they are transgender.
  • 1.4 million–-or 0.6%—of Americans say they are transgender.

LGBTQ+ Population By US State

  • As of 2017, California, Texas, Florida, and New York had between 500,000 and 1.4 million individuals identifying as LGBTQ+.
  • An estimated 4% of adults in California identify as LGBTQ+.
  • Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, and South Dakota have some of the smallest LGBTQ+ populations. (between 8,000 and 49,000)

What States Have The Largest LGBTQ+ Populations?

US State% Of LGBTQ+ AdultsTotal LGBTQ+ Population% Of LGBTQ+ WorkforceTotal LGBTQ+ Workers% Of LGBTQ+ Adults With Children
California5.30%18590006%119400024%
Texas4.10%10530005%64700029%
Florida4.60%8860005%54500024%
New York5.10%9130006%58800022%

*All statistics from 2019-2020

What States Have The Smallest LGBTQ+ Populations?

US State% Of LGBTQ+ AdultsTotal LGBTQ+ Population% Of LGBTQ+ WorkforceTotal LGBTQ+ Workers% Of LGBTQ+ Adults With Children
Idaho2.80%480003%2500044%
Montana2.90%300003%1800019%
Wyoming3.30%180003%1000028%
North Dakota2.70%200003%1200010%
South Dakota3%250003%1500029%

*All statistics from 2019-2020

LGBTQ+ By Generation And Gender

  • 1 out of 6 adults from Gen Z considers themselves to be LGBTQ+.
  • 72% of Americans in Gen Z say they are bisexual.
  • 9.1% of American Millennials are LGBTQ+.
  • 50% of American Millennials say they are bisexual.
  • 3.8% of American Generation X identify as LGBTQ+.
  • Only 2% of American Baby Boomers identify as LGBTQ+.
  • One-third of Millennials identify as non-binary.
  • Only 8% of those over the age of 45 identify as non-binary.
  • Women are more than 30% more likely to identify as part of the LGBTQ+ community.
  • Women are 138% more likely than men to identify as bisexual.

How Many LGBTQ+ Are In The Military?

  • In 1982, the US military enacted a policy to ban gay men and lesbians from serving in the Army.
  • Until 2011, openly gay, lesbian, and bisexual individuals were prohibited from serving in the military.
  • It wasn’t until 2021 that transgender people were permitted to serve.
  • Estimates range from 1,320 to 15,500 transgender people actively serving in the military.

What Percentage Of Homeless Are LGBT In The US?

  • 29% of American transgender people live in poverty.
  • Conversely, only 15.7% of cisgender people live in poverty.
  • LGBTQ+ adults are more than 200% more likely than heterosexual adults to live below the poverty line.
  • Young members of the LGBTQ+ community are 120% more likely to experience poverty and homelessness than straight-identifying youth.

Who Are The Homeless Youth In America?

  • 7% of the US LGBTQ+ community are considered youths, but they make up some 40% of the youth homeless population in the US.
  • LGBTQ+ people make up 29% of the youth homeless population in Santa Clara County, California.

 

What Are Some LGBTQ+ Health Disparities?

  • One-third of transgender individuals have needed to educate their physician or healthcare provider about gender identity.
  • 70% of young LGBTQ+ members admit to a decline in mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 15% of American LGBTQ+ members have put off medical assessments or treatment due to fear of discrimination.
  • 73% of LGBTQ+ youth experience anxiety.
  • 58% of LGBTQ+ youth experience depression.

What Are The Problems And Challenges Faced By The LGBTQ+ Community?

  • Overall, more than 50% of LGBTQ+ people have experienced depression.
  • 3 out of 5 LGBTQ+ members have experienced anxiety.
  • 30% of transgender people say they avoid medical treatment due to a lack of understanding by physicians and healthcare workers.
  • 69% of newly diagnosed HIV cases are non-white gay and bisexual men.
  • In 2018, 37% of new HIV diagnoses were African-American gay or bisexual men.
  • In comparison, only 27% of new HIV diagnoses were gay or bisexual caucasian men.

Does LGBTQ Count As Underrepresented In Medicine?

  • 48% of LGBTQ+ youth fear discussing their mental health concerns as the reason they could not obtain the mental health care they need.
  • 40% of LGBTQ+ senior adults aged 60 to 80 say their healthcare provider does not know their sexual identity.
  • 10% of LGBTQ+ say they’ve been discriminated against by a healthcare professional within the past year.

Where Is The Best Place To Live For LGBT?

  • Americans are increasingly accepting of equal rights for LGBTQ+ people.
  • In 2019, 93% of Americans said gay people should have equal rights regarding job opportunities.
  • In 2019, 83% of Americans said gay or lesbian relations between consenting adults should be legal.
  • In 2019, 75% of Americans said gays and lesbians should have the right to adopt children.
  • 89% of LGBTQ+ youth say that seeing non-cisgender representation in movies and on TV made them feel good about themselves.

 

What Is The Safest Place To Live For LGBTQ+?

  • Canada, Australia, and Western European countries are some of the most accepting places in the world for LGBTQ+ individuals.
  • 80% of respondents from those countries say society should accept homosexuality.
  • As of 2021, in Canada, the LGBTQ+ population was estimated to have reached 1 million.
  • Surveys show that individuals who are more educated, support left-wing ideologies, and are not very religious are generally more accepting of homosexuality.
  • India and South Africa have made the most progress when it comes to an increased acceptance of homosexuality.

How Can Employers Support LGBTQ Employees At Work?

  • In 2020, 206 large corporations signed a petition backing the US Supreme Court’s decision to protect LGBTQ+ people from workplace discrimination.
  • More than 95% of Fortune 500 companies have implemented non-discrimination policies that include gender and sexual orientation.
  • 71% of Fortune 500 companies now offer transgender-inclusive health benefits.

What Are The Challenges Faced By LGBTQ+ In The Workplace?

  • However, 21% of LGBTQ+ adults say they’ve been treated unjustly by an employer.
  • LGBTQ+ women are less represented than women in America’s top companies.
  • There are only four open LGBTQ+ CEOs in America.
  • There are no open LGBTQ+ transgender CEOs in the United States.
  • LGBTQ+ women can be found in only 2.3% of all entry-level jobs.
  • LGBTQ+ women make up no more than 1.6% of all managerial positions.
  • LGBTQ+ women of color in the workplace are more likely to experience “onlyness” —a feeling characterized by being the only person on a team or in the workplace with their gender or sexual identity.
  • 15% of LGBTQ+ women say their sexual identity will harm their career.
  • 30% of LGBTQ+ men feel their sexuality will harm their job.

What Are The Problems Faced By LGBTQ+ Community In Society?

It’s safe to say that society has come a long way in accepting people for who they are, regardless of race, gender, or sexuality.

However, there’s still a lot of discrimination and persecution of non-cisgender people that goes on in the world.

  • 4 of 10 LGBTQ+ adults say they’ve been discriminated against by a friend or family member because of their gender or sexual identity.
  • LGBTQ+ females are twice as likely than straight women or male LGBTQ+ members to “play along” when they hear sexual discussions or jokes about non-cisgender identities in the workplace.
  • 50% of LGBTQ+ women hear their coworkers make jokes or comments about their identity.
  • 75% of young LGBTQ+ members say they’ve experienced discrimination at least once.
  • 58% of LGBTQ+ adults have been laughed at or have been the target of slurs.
  • 1 in 2 LGBTQ+ youth says they’ve experienced discrimination within the last year.
  • 13% of LGBTQ+ youth have been sent to conversion therapy.
  • 83% of those subjected to conversion therapy say it happened before 18.
  • 54% of American LGBTQ+ members have hidden a relationship for fear of being discriminated against by family, friends, or peers.
  • 46% of non-white transgender people say they haven’t voted in the past because their ID showed the wrong name, gender, or photo.
  • 30% of LGBTQ+ adults say they’ve been physically threatened or attacked based on gender.
  • In 2020, 44 transgender people were killed in the United States.
  • In the first five months of 2021, 27 non-cisgender people were killed in the US.
  • There are 71 countries where identifying or engaging in homosexuality is considered a crime punishable by law.
  • Most countries where homosexuality is illegal are in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa.
  • In 11 countries, the death penalty is still imposed for individuals accused of same-sex sexual activity.
  • In the Balkans and parts of Eastern Europe, nearly 70% of LGBTQ+ individuals are never open about their orientation or sexuality due to fear of discrimination.

LGBTQ+ Suicide And Attempted Suicide Rates

  • 1 out of 8 LGBTQ+ people between 18 and 24 have attempted suicide.
  • Nearly half of all transgender people have contemplated suicide.
  • 45% of young LGBTQ+ members have considered committing suicide within the past year.
  • 14% of LGBTQ+ youth have attempted suicide within the past year.
  • LGBTQ+ youths with family support are 50% less likely to attempt suicide.
  • LGBTQ+ youths who attend schools that are friendly to LGBTQ+ have lower rates of attempted suicide.
  • 60% of LGBTQ+ youths who sought medical care for their mental health were unable to find it.
  • 59% of transgender males contemplated suicide within the past year.
  • 48% of transgender females contemplated suicide within the past year.
  • 21% of pansexuals have attempted suicide within the past year.

Do Religions Accept The LGBTQ+ Community?

  • 29% of LGBTQ+ adults say they’ve felt unwelcome in a place of worship.
  • 84% of LGBTQ+ adults say the Muslim religion is unfriendly toward them.
  • 83% of LGBTQ+ adults say the Mormon faith is unfriendly toward them.
  • 79% of LGBTQ+ adults say the Catholic religion is unfriendly toward them.
  • 73% of LGBTQ+ adults say evangelical churches are unfriendly toward them.
  • Less than 50% of LGBTQ+ adults say the Jewish or Protestant religions are unfriendly towards them.
  • 1 in 10 LGBTQ+ adults says the Jewish or Protestant faiths are friendly toward them.
  • LGBTQ+ adults tend to be less religious than the general public.
  • 48% of LGBTQ+ adults say they have no religious affiliations whatsoever.

How Many People Of Color Are LGBTQ+?

  • 17% of African-American LGBTQ+ youths say they’ve been physically threatened or injured because of their gender identity.
  • African-American youth who have family support have lower attempted suicide rates.
  • 76% of Indigenous LGBTQ+ youth have experienced discrimination due to gender or sexual identity.

How Do LGBTQ+ Have Children?

Can two females have a baby? Can two men have a baby?

They say that having children is one of the greatest joys in life.

Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising to learn that gay, lesbian, and LGBTQ people everywhere want children just like anyone who identifies as straight.

  • 20% of same-sex couples who share a household have at least one child.
  • 12.1% of unmarried same-sex couples have children.
  • Lesbian and bisexual women are more likely than LGBTQ+ men to have or want to have children.
  • 56% of adult LGBTQ+ members say they’ve told their mother about their gender or sexual orientation.
  • Only 39% of adult LGBTQ+ members say they’ve told their father.
  • The median age for believing or feeling like they were not straight or cisgender is 12.
  • By 17, most gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender people know they are not straight or cisgender.
  • The median age of those who share their gender or sexual orientation with a family member or close friend is 20.
  • Gay men tend to come out to family and friends earlier than bisexuals and lesbians.
  • 20% of adult LGBTQ+ respondents say they’ve been hit, slapped, kicked, or physically assaulted by a partner.
  • 75% of LGBTQ+ who have experienced domestic abuse did not report the incident to the police.

Can Same-Sex Couples Get Married?

Although same-sex marriage is now widely accepted and legal in most places, there are still many places in the world where it’s illegal.

Fortunately, in 2015, the US Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in all fifty US states.

However, same-sex marriage hasn’t always been accepted.

  • In 2003, researchers estimated that only 32% of the general public favored same-sex marriage.
  • More recently, more than 50% of the general public is in favor of same-sex marriage.
  • However, this is still far below the 93% of adult LGBTQ+ members who favor same-sex marriage.
  • 39% of LGBTQ+ members say that the issue of same-sex marriage has drawn attention away from problems that are more important for the community.
  • However, 58% say same-sex marriage should be a priority, even though it may take attention away from other issues.
  • Only 16% of LGBTQ+ adults are married, compared to roughly 50% of the general population.
  • 66% of lesbians are in a committed relationship, compared to only 40% of gay men.
  • Bisexual women are more likely to be in a relationship than bisexual men (68% vs. 40%)

Sources


Virginity Statistics

The decision to have sex for the first time is often a deeply personal one and can be influenced by a range of factors such as cultural, social, and religious beliefs, relationship dynamics, and personal values.

Despite its personal nature, the topic of losing virginity is one that has generated a great deal of curiosity and fascination. That’s why we have spent hours and hours exploring and gathering key facts and figures about virginity.

This article will delve into the available statistics on virginity loss, including the age at which people typically lose their virginity.

average age to lose virginity

Key Virginity Statistics

What’s the Average Age To Lose Virginity in US?

To begin with, there are multiple studies related to virginity statistics and they all show slightly different results. However, if we take the average, then it is near 17.

A research organization questioned 500 people about their sexual journeys and this was the result.

  • 17.4 was the average age to lose virginity.
  • 15.2 was the average age of sexual awakening.

Another report by showed the average age to lose virginity is 17 years.

A 2011-2015 research shows the following result considering losing virginity through penetrative intercourse.

  • 17 is the average age for men to lose their virginity.
  • 17.3 is the average age for women to lose their virginity.

An interesting study by a reputable organization found the following results.

  • 16.9 is the average age for men to lose their virginity.
  • 17.2 is the average age for women to lose their virginity.
  • Between the age of 15 and 18, there are more female virgins than males.
  • At the age of 19, there are more male virgins than females.
  • 17.6 years – The average age to lose virginity living with two parents.
  • 16 years – The average age to lose virginity without living with two parents.
  • 6% of 12-year-olds living without both parents lost their virginity
  • 2% of 12-year-olds that live with both parents lost their virginity
  • 15.6 years – The average age to lose virginity for women smoking 2 or more cigarettes per day.
  • 17.5 years – The average age to lose virginity for women smoking 1 or fewer cigarettes per day.

Average Age To Lose Virginity By Country

Different regions certainly have different ages for virginity loss according to the virginity statistics. For example, in Muslim countries or those with other religious beliefs, you would find an older average age to lose virginity. On the other hand, Scandinavian and liberal countries have a much younger age.

What Age Do Most People Lose Virginity?

In 2016, a survey of 44 countries found the average age of losing virginity globally. The following were the results.

  • Iceland: 15.6 years
  • Denmark: 16.1 years
  • Sweden: 16.2 years
  • Sweden: 16.2 years
  • Norway: 16.5 years
  • Finland: 16.5 years
  • Israel: 16.7 years
  • Bulgaria: 16.9 years
  • Portugal: 16.9 years
  • Czech Republic: 17.2 years
  • Chile: 17.2 years
  • Belgium: 17.2 years
  • Ireland: 17.3 years
  • Croatia: 17.3 years
  • Austria: 17.3 years
  • Brazil: 17.4 years
  • Germany: 17.6 years
  • Turkey: 17.8 years
  • New Zealand: 17.8 years
  • Slovakia: 17.8 years
  • Australia: 17.9 years
  • United States: 18 years
  • Canada: 18.1 years
  • Netherlands: 18.1 years
  • Greece: 18.1 years
  • Switzerland: 18.2 years
  • United Kingdom: 18.3 years
  • France: 18.5 years
  • Russia: 18.7 years
  • Mexico: 18.7 years
  • South Africa: 18.7 years
  • Italy: 18.9 years
  • Taiwan: 18.9 years
  • Poland: 19 years
  • Indonesia: 19.1 years
  • Spain: 19.2 years
  • Japan: 19.4 years
  • Vietnam: 19.7 years
  • Nigeria: 19.7 years
  • China: 22.1 years
  • Hong Kong: 20.2 years
  • Thailand: 20.5 years
  • Singapore: 22.8 years
  • India: 22.9 years
  • Malaysia: 23 years

What percent of people lose their virginity at 21?

The following results are according to a research

  • 38% of adults between 18 and 24 years are virgins, globally.
  • Malaysia and Singapore have the highest number of young adult virgins at 84%. It is followed by Indonesia (78%), Thailand (53%), and the Philippines (47%).
  • 53% of adults (18 to 24) are virgins in the United States.

What percent of 15 year olds are virgins?

After conducting 1000 interviews with 13 to 16 years old teenagers, a research organization came up with the following results.

  • 41% of teens aged 15-16 are sexually active.
  • 87% of teens between 13-16 years old have never had sex.
  • 73% have never been sexually intimate.
  • 19% of 15-16 years-old have had oral sex.

Another research shows that:

  • 13% of teens lost their virginity before reaching the age of 15.

What percentage of 17 year olds are virgins?

  • 60% of 12th-graders (17-18 year-olds) have had sex. This means almost 40% are virgins.
  • 17 is the average age for men to lose their virginity.
  • 17.3 is the average age for women to lose their virginity.
  • There are likely to be more female virgins than males at 17 years of age.

Are there more male virgins than females?

According to a report:

  • 14.3% of males between 20 and 24 are virgins. Contrarily, there are only 12.3% of female virgins from the same age group.
  • Males have higher odds of being a virgin.
  • Between the age of 15 and 18, there are more female virgins than males.
  • At the age of 19, there are more male virgins than females.

What percentage of 14 year olds have lost their virginity?

 

  • 13% of teens lost their virginity before 15.
  • 40% of females between the age of 13 and 14 said their first sexual intercourse was unwanted, non-voluntary, or forced.
  • 27% of teens between the age of 13 and 16 are sexually active.
  • Close to half of these people had oral sex or intercourse.
  • 87% of 13-16 years old teens are virgins.

Average Age of Virginity Loss by State

In short, there isn’t a specific number to show the average virginity loss age in different states. Nevertheless, we have the list regarding which states have the highest and lowest number of virgins.

States With The Highest Virginity Rate

  • Utah
  • South Dakota
  • Idaho
  • Iowa
  • Arkansas

Traditional nuclear families are the norm in these states, and also there isn’t a lot of foreign travel. Additionally, traditional religious states are the ones with higher virginity loss ages. Mormons, who make up the majority of the population in Utah, have a strict moral code when it comes to having sex.

States With The Lowest Virginity Rate

  • Vermont
  • Delaware
  • New Mexico
  • Oregon
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • Nevada
  • Hawaii

Evidently, these are the North Eastern states or those that have a high number of tourists and immigrants. Moreover, they also don’t follow the typical and traditional religious or cultural values.

Average Age Teens Lose Their Virginity

The average age teens lose their virginity eventually depends on many factors. The state you are living in, the household conditions, the environment, as well as other aspects are taken into account.

Furthermore, multiple different reports depict different results. The following are the average ages to lose virginity for teens according to the 2011-2015 virginity statistics research data.

  • 17 is the average age for men to lose their virginity.
  • 17.3 is the average age for women to lose their virginity.
  • More than 70% of teens (15 to 19-year-olds) lost their virginity.

Now according to a 2019 high-school report , we get the following:

  • 38% of high-school teens had sex.
  • 9% had at least 4 or further sexual partners.
  • 7% were forced to have sexual intercourse.

Are College Virgins Rare?

Even though there’s a general perception that almost all teens in college are not virgins, this isn’t entirely true. Contrarily, there is a large chunk of students who have never had sex in college or before college.

So, there are three studies, and all show different virginity statistics. But the common thing is that there are more college virgins than people assume.

  • There are 29.3% of virgins in college.
  • 39% of the 700 students were virgins across the US.
  • 49% of men were not sexually active.
  • 41% of women were not sexually active.
  • 20% of college students graduate as virgins without having sex. That’s 1 in every 5 people.

The Average Age People Lost Their Virginity In Each Decade

Firstly, we have Generation Z who have the lowest age to lose their virginity. On the other hand, Generation X was the oldest in terms of having their first sexual intercourse.

Once again, we are quoting the results from the survey where they interviewed 500 Europeans and 500 Americans. The following were the ages to lose virginity across generations:

  • Baby Boomers (born between World War 2 and the early 60s) – 17.6 years
  • Generation X (born between the early 60s and 80s) – 18.1 years
  • Millennials (born between 1980 and 2000) – 17.4 years
  • Generation Z (born after 2000) – 16.2 years

Average Age of Virginity Loss

Following are some Virginity statistics showing the average age to lose virginity.

  • 17 is the average age for men to lose their virginity.
  • 17.3 is the average age for women to lose their virginity.
  • More than 70% of teens (15 to 19-year-olds) lose their virginity.
  • Iceland has the lowest average age of losing virginity at 15.6 years.
  • Malaysia has the highest average age of losing virginity at 23 years.
  • 38% of high-school teens were not virgins.
  • 9% had at least 4 or further sexual partners.
  • 7% were forced to have sexual intercourse.
  • 17.6 years – The average age to lose virginity living with two parents.
  • 16 years – The average age to lose virginity without living with two parents.

The Average Age Gay and Bisexual Men Lose Their Virginity

Gay and Bisexual people lose their virginity a bit later than heterosexuals. However, bisexual men lost their virginities much earlier and that’s exactly what the virginity statistics show below.

The following survey involved a combined 1000 people from the US and UK.

  • Gay men lost their virginity at an average age of 17.9 years.
  • Gay men had their sexual awakening at an average age of 14 years.
  • Bisexual men lost their virginity at an average age of a little over 16 years.
  • Bisexual men had their sexual awakening at an average age of 15.4 years.

The Average Age Lesbian and Bisexual Women Lose Their Virginity

A research organization took responses from 8,566 women about the time they first had sex with another woman. There isn’t an average age figure but the results do show the percentage of the ages these women first had sex with a lady partner.

  • 35.3% of lesbian or bisexual women had sex with another woman at the age of 17-19 years.
  • 23.4% of lesbian or bisexual women did it between 20-22 years.
  • 20.2% of lesbian or bisexual women had their first sexual interaction with another woman at the age of 16 or lower.
  • 9.8% of lesbian or bisexual women lost their virginity with another woman aged 23-25.
  • 3.7% of lesbian or bisexual women were aged 26-28 and 29+ for their first time.
  • 3.9% never had sex with another woman.
  • 83% of lesbian or bisexual women had sex with another woman before turning 18.
  • 70% of lesbian or bisexual women had sex with a man before turning 18.


Sources


Anal Sex Statistics [2024 Data] – How Many Americans Tried Butt Sex?

Long accepted in the homosexual realm, where there have been “tops” and “bottoms” for almost as long as geometry has existed, anal sex is still considered something of a unicorn in the American heterosexual landscape.

Although ubiquitous in pornography, anal intercourse is perceived as difficult to get and to receive. But what do the statistics show about the prevalence of butt sex and its enjoyability?

anal sex statistics

Key Anal Sex Stats

  • 82% of women report that anal sex was first suggested by their male partner.
  • 35.9% of women report having had anal sex at least once in their lifetime.
  • 42.3% of men and report having had anal sex at least once in their lifetime.
  • 14% of men aged 18-70 have had anal sex in the past month.
  • 10% of women aged 18-70 have had anal sex in the past month.
  • 47% of heterosexual men and 38.5% of heterosexual women aged 18-44 say they have had anal sex.
  • 25% of women report being forced into anal sex on at least one occasion.
  • 11% of women say the idea for anal sex was theirs.
  • Women’s positive reactions to anal sex includes liking the sensation and feeling greater intimacy with a partner.
  • Negative responses to anal sex include feeling pain and shame.
  • 28% of people in one study said that substances influenced their experience of anal pleasure.
  • 14 states still have anti-sodomy laws in place, even between consenting adults.

What Counts as Anal Sex?


You might be surprised to hear that, for the purposes of research, anal sex is defined as any play involving the anus. This means butt play can include the use of toys, fingers, and a tongue, not just anal penetration with a penis.

How Many Americans Have Tried Anal Sex?

The numbers vary but typically more than one-third of the American population say they have tried anal sex.

  • 42.3% of men and 35.9% of women report having had anal sex at least once in their lifetime according to a study.

Nonetheless, anal sex is not a frequent practice in the bedroom. A study by researchers at the University of Michigan found that

  • 14% of men aged 18-70 have had anal sex in the past month.
  • 10% of women aged 18-70 have had anal sex in the past month.

How have anal sex statistics changed over time in America?

  • As many as 40% of couples say they’ve tried anal sex.
  • In the 1950s, fewer than 15% of Americans reported having anal sex.
  • In the early 1990s, 9% of women reported having anal intercourse in the past year.
  • A 2010 study showed that 13.2% of women reported having anal sex in the past year.

Anal sex might be more prevalent among heterosexual couples than you’d think.

  • 47% of heterosexual men and 38.5% of heterosexual women aged 18-44 say they have had anal sex in their lifetime.

The following table shows how the numbers break down by age group:

Percentage of heterosexuals who have tried anal with a partner of the opposite gender
Age
Gender18-2425-3435-44
Male29.30%49.30%44.80%
Female28.40%38.50%39.00%
  • Many college-age people associate anal sex with less commitment than vaginal sex
  • Older adults see anal sex as an indication of trust and love in a partnership.

It seems this change in perception of butt play over the lifespan might have something to do with the perceived risks of pregnancy.

In fact, try doing a search for “Do people have anal sex to avoid getting pregnant?” and

  • 100% of first- and second-page results are for “Can I get pregnant from anal sex?

There are a lot of naive (or young) people out there very concerned about pregnancy and butt penetration. This might also mean there are a lot more people trying anal sex, or wondering about it.

Anal intercourse might also be associated with sexual promiscuity, or a woman who is hungry to please her partner at all costs.

Here the prevalence of anal in pornography might also play a role of perpetuating fantasies of anal intercourse – and its practice by loose couples not in a committed relationship.

The popular perception is that men initiate or pressure women into having anal sex, and the research data bear this out.

  • 82% of women report that anal sex was first suggested by their male partner.
  • 11% of women say the idea of anal sex was theirs.
  • 25% of women report being forced into anal sex on at least one occasion.

How Often Do Americans Have Butt Sex Each Month?

Although many people have tried it, anal sex is not exactly a common practice. Numbers vary, but generally under a third of women say they’ve had anal in the recent past.

  • 13.2% of women reported having anal sex in the past year.
  • This is about in line with a 2021 study that found that
    • 14% of men aged 18-70 have had anal sex in the past month.
    • 10% of women aged 18-70 have had anal sex in the past month.
  • Although lower than a 2009 that suggests that 32% of women had anal sex within the past year.

It’s safe to say that less than a third of women regularly have anal sex, although we would be interested in seeing that broken down by age.

How Many Americans Have Tried Pegging?

Pegging involves a woman penetrating a partner with a strap-on dildo. It’s a special brand of sex that certainly has some people wondering.

A 2018 survey asked 500 Americans about their sexual fantasies.

  • 20% of American adults surveyed said they’d fantasized about pegging.

A more comprehensive study found that:

  • Of 4,000 Americans surveyed,
    • 60% of men had fantasized about received anal sex
    • 40% of women had fantasized about giving anal penetration.

Perhaps these increased numbers reflect the inclusion of homosexual fantasies, not just a hetero woman with a male partner (which is the strict definition of pegging).

There are no long and hard numbers on how many couples have tried pegging, but

  • Prostate massage toy sales are up 56% since 2017.

…So a lot of people are investing in anal stimulation.

The prostrate is also known as the male g-spot, a bundle of nerves a couple inches within the male rectum.

It’s known for giving mind-blowing orgasms and you’re completely normal to be curious. Exploring body fun like this does not make you gay.

How Many Women Have Tried Anal Sex?


The numbers vary but well over 30% of Americans say they have tried anal sex over the course of their sexual lives.

  • 35.9% of women report having had anal sex at least once in their lifetime according to a study.

Why Women Enjoy and Want Anal Sex

Some heterosexual couples associate anal as a male power-play while others regard anal play as a sign of loving trust, a “gift” exchanged between partners.

Certain times, women have anal sex for certain reasons. These include:

  • To avoid vaginal sex (women on their period, having discharge, etc.)
  • A woman who wants to please her partner
  • Anal sex is sometimes considered more intimate than vaginal sex and for special partners
  • Anal sex can happen more often under the influence of drugs or alcohol
Women’s reports of experiencing anal
Positive physicalPositive emotionalNegative physicalNegative emotional
“Liked the sensation”“More intimate”“Painful”“Shame”
“No side effects”“Only for a special partner”“Started too fast/Not enough time to relax”“Disgust”

Given these starkly divergent reactions, perhaps it’s not surprising that substance use has been found to play a role in the practice of anal sex.

  • 28% of people in one study said that substances influenced their experience of anal pleasure. 

Why Some Women Dislike Anal Sex

Not only is anal intercourse not always pleasurable for both parties, it’s still an active taboo in many parts of America. In fact, anal intercourse is still outlawed in a number of American states.

  • 14 states still have anti-sodomy laws in place, and that’s typically between consenting adults.

With its dynamics of pleasure and pain, power and servility, and even fluctuating legality, it’s no wonder that people take an extra drink or toke on the way to experiencing anal.

  • 77.6% of women have had a bad experience with anal.

Why (Straight) Men Want to Have Anal Sex (with Their Woman)

Why do heterosexual men like anal sex, anyway? A survey found a few reasons:

  • Variety. Who doesn’t want to spice things up?
  • Intimacy. Some people feel anal intercourse is “more raw” and shows devotion on the part of the woman.
  • Experimentation. Why not give it a try? You might like it.
  • Forbidden fruit. Overcoming taboos can be sexy.
  • Domination/submission. Anal intercourse can be a power dynamic.

Anal sex has a number of things going for it. It’s the cunnilingus of the 21st century. (Oral sex used to be taboo and in fact still is, in some places.)

One unmentioned factor is that the anus is muscled differently than the vagina and hence can provide a tighter or just a different fit.

We’re not saying heterosexual men are trying to replace vaginal sex. We’re just coming back to the variety and increased rawness of it.

What Types of Anal Sex Have Americans Tried?


As mentioned before, anal sex technically includes any type of anal-rectal stimulation, not just penetration. In a 2022 study:

  • 40% of women like ‘anal surfacing’: being caressed there by a partner or sex toy without penetration.
  • About 35% of women have enjoyed ‘anal shallowing’, which is being lightly penetrated in the anus by a partner sex toy, no more than about the first inch.
  • 40% of women choose ‘anal pairing’: having their anus caressed or penetrated coinciding with other sex acts, such as vaginal sex or clitoral caresses.

What Types of Anal Play has Each Generation Tried?

As mentioned above, anal sex is gaining ground. There seems to be a generational difference in perception of butt play for hetero couples.

Younger heterosexual couples see anal almost casually, perhaps due to its prevalence in porn, while the lower numbers from the 1990s suggest that older generations see it as more taboo.

  • In its 2022 Year in Review, PornHub reports that the “Anal” category is in the top 5 most viewed worldwide.

The question is, if anal intercourse becomes more mainstream, will it cease to be taboo? Will it no longer be a “gift” or proof of intimacy?

That begs the follow-up question: will hetero couples in the next generations practice anal sex less frequently, or more?

Some researchers say they’ve already found a type of woman who’s most likely to engage in anal sex:

  • In her twenties,
  • reports no religious affiliation,
  • earns more money,
  • and has a higher level of education.

Anal intercourse was also more common among married women than single.

From the same study, other factors that played into a woman’s likelihood to have anal sex include:

  • They’ve had sex with another woman.
  • They’ve had an unintentional pregnancy.
  • They lost their virginity before the age of 16.
  • Being treated for an STI within the past year.

Draw your own conclusions, but we’re seeing a profile of an independent and perhaps sexually adventurous young woman who might need to be encouraged to use a condom.

Parallel to that is a trend for older, married women to experiment with anal sex. Again: People in long-term relationships get creative.

How Comfortable Are Americans Discussing Anal Sex?


We noted a slight rise in anal sex, from

  • 9% of women reporting anal intercourse in the past year in the early 1990s.
  • To 13.2% of women reported having anal sex in the past year in a 2010 study.

Now, this might actually be due to women becoming more comfortable talking about having anal sex.

Comfort in talking about one’s sex life is a baseline problem with these types of survey studies. How else can we explain this discrepancy:

  • 47% of heterosexual men and 38.5% of heterosexual women aged 18-44 say they have had anal sex.

That higher number of men might be bragging (or experimenting with anal with men and saying it was a woman), or hetero women aren’t fessing up to having anal sex.

Also, certain studies self-select a certain group of people without intention to do so.

One study might target a population who’s more open to talking about sex, while others reflect more of an American average.

For example, a poll found that

  • One third of 2,000 Americans felt “very comfortable” talking about their sex lives with others.

What this poll really shows is that shoppers at a sex-toy company are more comfortable discussing sex.

No big surprise there.

How Many Gay Men Have Topped or Bottomed?


Cultural magazines have reported lately that it’s incorrect to assume that gay men always have anal sex.

This type of article also stresses that “top” and “bottom” are fluid and not fixed aspects of a male homosexual relationship.

Which Types of Butt Sex Have Gay, Straight, and Bisexuals Have Tried?

  • 35-40% of women enjoy an array of anal play, be it surface play, light penetration, or pairing anal play with another sexual act (like vaginal sex).

In a vast survey of almost 25,000 gay and bisexual men in America, gay men reported relatively infrequent penetrative sex.

  • 35.5% of men received anal sex within the last 30 days.
  • 33.8% of participants gave anal intercourse.

Allowing for some discrepancies in memory or honesty, it seems about one third of gay male couples has anal intercourse regularly.

We’re guessing this is supplemented by other types of anal play, such as rimming and the use of toys, or perhaps mutual masturbation and penis play.

Conclusion

Can anal sex cause HIV? No, anal sex is not a cause for any STI, but the risks of STI transmission – including HIV – are higher with anal than vaginal intercourse.

This is because the lining of the anus is thinner and tears more easily than the vagina, allowing for infection.

Health Risks of Anal Sex

There are some risks associated with penetrating a cavity that wasn’t necessarily made to undergo penetration.

  • Rectal bleeding from anal fissures or tears, which is typically not serious.
  • Hemorrhoids can form after anal intercourse.
  • Bleeding is also a symptom of gonorrhea of the rectum.
  • Chlamydia and gonorrhea can affect both penis and rectum.
  • Many STIs are more easily transmitted by anal penetration than by vaginal intercourse. This is because the wall of the anus is thinner and can tear, allowing for opportunistic infection.

Many people see condom use as optional during heterosexual anal sex, for there is no risk of pregnancy.

  • As many as 82% of women reported not using a condom the first time they had anal intercourse.

However, given the risk for disease, staying safe is the way to go unless you’re exploring with a committed partner.

Curious about anal? Have a talk with your sex partner and grab some lube or slap a condom on that bad boy. Keep it slow and playful (or intimate) and be open to enjoying it.

You, too, could join the roughly 10% of Americans who have regular anal sex.


Sources


Foot Fetish Statistics (2024) – How Common Is Podophilia?

How common are foot fetishes? Why do some people like feet? Are there any risks to consider when exploring foot play?

To answer these questions, we’ve combed through a mountain of data, facts, and statistics about foot fetishism. Below, we’re diving into everything there is to know about podophilia in 2024.

foot fetish statistics

How Common Are Foot Fetishes?

  • 14.28% of Americans have a foot fetish (1 out of 7)
  • In the U.S., the keyword “foot worship” is searched at least 40,000 times per month.
  • “Foot fetish” ranked as the 11th most searched sexual kink in the United States, with roughly 1.7 million searches per month.

With numbers like these, it’s easy to see that being sexually attracted to a partner’s feet is actually quite common.

Key Foot Fetish Statistics

In the following sections, we’ve compiled some of the most exciting statistics surrounding the love of feet, foot fetish, foot worship, and everything related to foot fetishism.

  • A study found that, of 5000 individuals, 47% admitted sexual arousal related to feet.
  • 1 out of 7 Americans have or have had sexual fantasies related to feet.
  • Fetish interests are significantly more prevalent among men than women.
  • Older age groups, between the ages of 48 and 65, were less into BDSM and fetish interests than their younger counterparts.
  • 61.4% of people admitted to having a fetish in their early 20s, typically before 25.
  • 88% of participants that admitted to having a footwear fetish identified as homosexual, similarly 12% identified themselves as having a bisexual orientation.
  • One study lists foot fetishism as one of 26 paraphilic tendencies, which include sexual attraction to armpits, breasts, legs, hands, ears, teeth, buttocks, and more.

What Is a Foot Fetish?

  • When a person has a sexual attraction toward feet, they can be said to have a fetish for feet. They are aroused by every aspect of feet, toes, ankles, or the entire foot.
  • The scientific term for this is podophilia. It is also referred to as foot partialism.
  • Podophilia is one of many paraphilic attractions (body part fetishes) where an individual fetishizes body parts other than the genitals.
  • When an individual has a sexual kink towards feet, they get sexual gratification from seeing, thinking about, touching, licking feet, or having sexual intercourse with either the male or female foot.
  • Some enjoy podophilia as only a tiny part of their sexual repertoire. But for many others, foot fetish is considered necessary for them to enjoy sex and achieve orgasm.

How Many People Have a Foot Fetish?

Because most fetish-related acts occur in the confines of an individual’s private life, very little is known about how many people are actually sexually attracted to feet.

But, based on the numbers we’ve found, it’s safe to say that podophilia is far from being a rare occurrence. And rather than being a “crazy foot fetish,” this type of fetish is really quite common!

How Popular Is Foot Fetish?

When we consider that the term “foot fetish” is searched more than 1.7 million times per month in the United States alone, it’s easy to see just how popular podophilia is.

After all, if there are that many monthly foot fetish searches in the U.S., the number of searches worldwide must be staggeringly more significant.

But who is searching for keywords like sexy feet, foot job, and podophilia?

Let’s review some demographic information to find out!

Demographics of Foot Fetish

One study found that age, sex, and sexual orientation were correlated with BDSM and fetish interests, such as podophilia.

  • The study looked at four age groups: 18 to 27, 28 to 37, 38 to 47, and 48 to 65, and found those in the oldest age group had less fetish interest than younger peers.
  • Between males and females, the prevalence of fetish interests is typically two to three times higher in men than women.
  • 20% of heterosexual men admitted to having sexual fantasies that involved feet. In contrast, only 8% of heterosexual women admitted the same.
  • Non-heterosexual participants scored lower on their interest in categories such as dominance, submission, visual, and attributes. But non-heterosexual participants scored higher on fetishism.

Which U.S. States Are Most Into Feet?

In the U.S., D.C. ranked as the state most interested in the term foot fetish. On the other hand, Connecticut and Illinois were the states with the least sexual interest in feet.

Let’s look at all the U.S. states with a considerable interest in feet.

  • In D.C., there were 48 searches per 10,000 people.
  • In New Jersey, there were 46 searches per 10,000 people.
  • In New York, there were 42 searches per 10,000 people.
  • There were 39 searches in Nevada and California per 10,000 people.
  • In Rhode Island, there were 35 searches per 10,000 people.
  • There were 34 searches in Texas and Florida per 10,000 people.
  • In Connecticut and Illinois, there were only 32 searches per 10,000 people.

Are Foot Fetishes More Popular Now?

Because sexual fetish acts primarily take place privately, there’s relatively little data available on whether or not the love of feet is more popular now than it was in the past.

But historically, the term fetishism didn’t appear in literature until the 19th century.

It wasn’t until then that Van Kraft Ebbing and Havelock Ellis first attempted to describe fetichism as a condition.

Before this, very little was known, and even less was studied regarding sexual fetishes.

But as we’ve mentioned, studies have found that older individuals seem to be less interested in BDSM and fetish than younger people.

This could indicate that sexual attraction to feet was less common in the past than it is today.

But more recently, the internet’s abundance of fetish material, and other media have helped the world of fetish gain popularity amongst today’s mainstream audience.

Therefore, it’s no surprise that more people seem to indulge in fetish than ever.

And we’ve found a few interesting statistics to back this up!

  • One study found more than 47% of participants have performed some activity related to BDSM or fetish.
  • 22% of participants admitted having sexual fantasies related to fetish and BDSM.
  • Nearly 13% of participants reported performing more than one fetish activity regularly.

So while there’s little information surrounding podophilia in the past, we can see that attraction to other people’s feet has gone from being virtually unknown to being a regular, everyday type of sexual fantasy for many people.

Why Do People Have Foot Fetishes?

Regarding fetishes, people can be sexually aroused by different thoughts, ideas, and concepts, ranging from standard genital stimulation to virtually all visual, textural, and auditory stimuli.

In other words, sometimes people are turned on by looking at feet. Other times, they are turned on by touching them. And still, other times, people are turned on by licking, sniffing, tasting, tickling, or the idea of feet.

But why do people develop a sexual attraction to feet? Where does this excitement towards feet come from? Are people born with podophilia?

What is the origin of foot fetishes?

Just like all body parts, our feet are connected to our brains by an intricate system of nerve fibers. Therefore, foot sensations, like any other sensation, can send a direct physiological response through our bodies.

Over the years, psychologists have attempted to postulate all kinds of theories as to why people develop foot fetishes.

  • Psychoanalytic (Freudian) theories suggest that “perversions,” such as podophilia, are permanent mental deviations from the norm. Psychoanalytic theories often associate the development of foot fetishes with one’s upbringing.
  • Behavioral theories suggest that classical or Pavlovian conditioning plays a role in the development of fetishes. With these theories, at some point, we see something that turns us on. Then we begin to associate our sexual arousal with that fetish object. Over time, the reinforcement of foot fetish behavior becomes normal.
  • Etiological theories suggest that fetishes are derived from ancient human instincts and natural hormones.
  • Sociocultural theories suggest that an individual social and cultural upbringing plays a vital role in the development of fetishes.
  • Biological theories suggest that our brains process sensory stimulation from our feet and genitals in a similar area. Therefore, it’s relatively easy for our brains to create an association between feet and sexual stimulation during normal development.

As to whether or not people are born with foot fetishes, to this day, there is no direct link between genetics and developing a fetish of any sort.

There are links, however, between personality types and a predisposition to developing a fetish. So while people aren’t born with podophilia, some people are born more likely to develop them throughout their lives.

Common Foot Fetish Fantasies

There are all sorts of different ways that individuals with a fetish toward feet can be turned on or get sexual gratification from actions with feet.

Let’s look at the most common types of fetishes and fantasies surrounding feet.

  • Foot jobs
  • Foot fetish parties
  • Licking, tasting and sucking toes
  • Tickling feet or being tickled
  • Sending or receiving feet pictures
  • Giving or receiving pedicures
  • Shoe fetish or footwear play
  • Foot massages
  • Foot worship (devout appreciation for feet)
  • Foot fantasy
  • Odor fetishism (the smell of feet)
  • Dirty feet, clean feet, or dry feet
  • Foot fetish sex toys
  • Fetish for phantom foot patients
  • Ugly or beautiful feet
  • Intense feelings for feet

Are There Any Risks to Consider?

For the most part, foot play is safe. However, like any other sexual activity, safety risks do exist.

Unless you’re planning on inserting toes or feet into your mouth, vagina, or anus, STIs aren’t likely to be transmitted.

However, transmitting STIs and other infections is still possible, and bodily injuries may occur if safety is not adequately considered.

Let’s review a few essential safety considerations surrounding foot play and fetishes.

  • Consent is always required when participating in any sexual activity, including podophilia.
  • It’s important to talk about your fetishes with your partner beforehand. Talking about what you like and dislike is integral to trust, which is vital during any sexual activity.
  • Hygiene is also of the utmost importance. Keeping feet clean and toenails trimmed is critical, especially if you or your partner plans to insert toes or feet into any bodily orifice, including the mouth, anus, or vagina.
  • Finally, avoiding foot play is essential if you or your partner have open sores, wounds, viral, bacterial, or fungal infections. Molluscum contagiosum is an unsightly skin infection that you can easily spread through skin-to-skin contact.

Can a Foot Fetish Be Psychologically Harmful?

Like any sexual activity, podophilia is safe both physically and psychologically as long as the act is consensual, hygiene is made a priority, and it’s not allowed to develop into an unhealthy obsession.

So to answer the question, foot fetishes are not inherently harmful to one’s psyche. And there’s no evidence to indicate that podophilia is a psychological disorder.

But like many other fetishes, podophilia can develop into an unhealthy fixation, leading to physical and psychological harm.

Therefore, as long as a person’s foot fetish doesn’t develop into an unhealthy obsession and isn’t interfering with a person’s job, family, or social life, there’s nothing psychologically harmful about enjoying it in one’s private life.

Behavioral Facts About Foot Fetish

  • Studies have also found evidence of fetishism in primates. But because they lack the same social structures as us, primate fetishes don’t present themselves nearly as often as they do in human society.
  • Podophilia and other common fetishes are widely regarded as being outside the norm. But today, many kink-positive apps, such as Feeld and Fetlife, make it easier than ever for fellow foot lovers to find communities of foot fetishists just like them.

What are the Biggest Misconceptions About Foot Fetishes?

  • Foot fetishes are dirty – There is nothing dirty or unclean about having or being with someone with a foot fetish, especially when hygiene is prioritized. However, some individuals are turned on specifically by dirty feet. So, in that case, foot fetishes can be dirty, but in a good way.
  • A fetish towards feet is not normal – While a fetish for body parts might fall outside the typical range of sex, there is nothing inherently abnormal about it. Especially when you consider how many people admit to having a foot fetish, you might even argue that having one is normal.
  • Foot fetishists are always submissive – While many foot fetishists are submissive, it’s just as likely that someone who enjoys foot play is the more dominant type. Both dominants, submissive, and everyone else in between enjoy foot play.

Conclusion

Ultimately, we can see that podophilia is only one of hundreds of common fetishes.

And when we look at the data, we can see that there’s nothing wrong with having a full-fledged foot fetish as long as knowledge, consent, and hygiene are prioritized.

So whether you already have a love for feet, and this read got your engine revving. Or you’ve never thought of a foot in “that way”, we hope you’ve learned a thing or two.

Either way, don’t yuck someone else’s yum!

Sources


Female Orgasm Statistics [2024 Data] – Orgasm Gap & Beyond

During orgasm, the body releases relaxing, feel-good neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and oxytocin.

For those who can, the results can be intense, mind-shattering pleasure that causes a variety of involuntary reactions in the body. However, our research tells us that not all women orgasm, which left us wondering:

How many women orgasm? Are there different types of orgasms? And what is the orgasm gap?

Below, we’re diving into the world of the female O to answer all this and more!

female orgasms statistics

Female Orgasm – Key Statistics

  • Female orgasms last an average of 20 to 35 seconds
  • 40% of women say their orgasms last up to one minute.
  • 61% of women between 18 and 24 had an orgasm the last time they had sex.
  • 70% of women in their 40s and 50s orgasmed the last time they had sex.
  • Women take an average of 13 minutes to reach orgasm.
  • More than 58% of women have faked an orgasm.
  • Women who have sex with women have more orgasms on average than women who have sex with men.
  • Women who have more sexual partners are more likely to have orgasms.
  • 29% of women use a vibrator to orgasm.
  • 48% of women need a partner’s help to orgasm.
  • 70% of women orgasm when foreplay is included in sex.
  • Most women achieve their first orgasm via masturbation, not from intercourse.
  • 70% of women in committed relationships regularly have an orgasm.
  • 25% of women orgasm consistently via vaginal intercourse.
  • Only 25% of women report having an orgasm from intercourse within one year of having partnered sex.
  • 36% of women need clitoral stimulation to reach orgasm.
  • 86% of women in same-sex relationships regularly orgasm.
  • 10% to 40% of women report trouble reaching orgasm.
  • 10% to 15% of women have never orgasmed.
  • 43% of women experience infrequent orgasms.
  • 50% of women aren’t satisfied with their orgasms.
  • Up to 60% of a woman’s ability to orgasm is genetic.
  • 15% and 43% of women have multiple orgasms.
  • 10% of women squirt when they orgasm.
  • The orgasm gap is real – 95% of straight men report always or nearly always having an orgasm – Only 65% of women reliably achieve orgasm from intercourse.
  • Women say they value their partner’s orgasm more than their own.
  • Women who communicate with their partners about their sexual needs are more likely to have orgasms.

What Is The Female Orgasm?

Just like a man, arousal and sexual stimulation of the genitals can cause women to orgasm.

The female orgasm is a complex physical and emotional bodily response.

It can be described as a transient peak of intense pleasure, accompanied by involuntary contractions of the pelvic muscles and an altered state of consciousness.

  • During orgasm, the brain sends out a wave of “feel-good” hormones, particularly a neurotransmitter called oxytocin, also known as the “love hormone.”
  • The female orgasm lasts an average of 20 to 35 seconds.
  • 40% of women say their orgasms last as long as 60 seconds.
  • Brain imaging studies show increased activity in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum during orgasm.
  • Heart rate, respiration, and blood pressure increase during orgasm.
  • Leading up to orgasm, the clitoris fills with blood causing it to expand in size.
  • The labia may also swell with blood causing them to appear puffier than usual.
  • Women often experience a “sex flush” during orgasm, where the skin on their face and chest turns pink or red due to increased blood flow.
  • Some women may expel a clear fluid during orgasm called “squirting.”

How Many Women Orgasm?

Studies show that women differ significantly regarding their ability and tendency to attain orgasm.

So what helps one woman orgasm might or might not help the next woman.

However, one thing is sure: women’s ability to achieve orgasm tends to improve with age.

  • Only 61% of women aged 18 to 24 had an orgasm the last time they had sexual intercourse.
  • 65% of women in their 30s reported an orgasm during their last romp.
  • 70% of women between 40 and 59 had an orgasm the last time they had sex.
  • It takes women an average of 13 minutes of having sex to reach orgasm.
  • Through masturbation, most women can orgasm in less than 8 minutes.
  • 58.8% of women say they’ve faked an orgasm in the past.
  • 29% of women use a vibrator to reach orgasm.
  • 48% of women say they need a partner’s hand or mouth to help them orgasm.
  • 70% of women say they frequently achieve orgasm during or due to foreplay.
  • Women orgasm more often when they find their partner genuinely attractive.
  • During a hookup, oral sex improves the chances of orgasm by as much as 48%.
  • During an initial hookup with a new partner, only 11% of women orgasm.
  • 16% of women reach orgasm during their second or third hookup.
  • In 50 pornographic videos, only 18.3% of the women shown had an orgasm. On the other hand, male orgasms were shown 81.7% of the time.
  • Most women under 35 say they experienced their first orgasm via masturbation.
  • 70% of women in long-term relationships report regular orgasms.
  • When having intercourse with casual partners, only 49% of women reach orgasm.

What Percent Of The Time Do Women Reach Orgasm During Vaginal Intercourse?

While every woman has the ability to orgasm during intercourse, not everyone does.

And while having an orgasm through vaginal penetration is sometimes blocked by mental obstacles, there are also medical conditions and medications that make achieving orgasm a challenge for some.

So just how many women can orgasm from intercourse alone?

  • Only 25% of women consistently orgasm during intercourse.
  • 46% of women say they almost always orgasm during intercourse.
  • Only 4% to 6% of women achieve orgasm from vaginal penetration.
  • Only 25% of women report orgasms during penetrative sex within one year of having sex with a partner.
  • More than 36% of women say they need clitoral stimulation to help them reach orgasm.
  • 38% of younger women orgasm during intercourse.
  • It takes 6 to 20 minutes for most women to reach orgasm when having sex with a partner.
  • 65% of straight women say they usually or always orgasm during sex.
  • 86% of women in same-sex relationships report regularly having an orgasm during intercourse.
  • 40% to 50% of women had their first orgasm during penetration after age 20.

Females Who Orgasm Regularly By Age

Below, we examine the percentage of women who can regularly achieve orgasm based on age.

As we can see, women between the ages of 35 and 44 orgasm with the most regularity.

Age GroupPercentage Of Women Who Regularly Orgasm
18 to 2433%
25 to 3441%
35 to 4461%
45 to 5449%
55 to 6448%
65 to 7440%

*all statistics from 2015

What Is Anorgasmia?

Anorgasmia is a documented medical disorder characterized by an individual’s inability to achieve orgasm.

However, it’s important to note that people of all different genders and sexualities, not only women, experience orgasm disorders.

How Common Is The Inability To Orgasm?

  • Women diagnosed with anorgasmia have delayed, infrequent, absent, or less intense orgasms despite adequate arousal and genital stimulation.
  • Trouble achieving orgasm is the second most common sexual problem reported by women.
  • 10% to 40% of women report trouble or a complete inability to reach orgasm.
  • Between 10% and 15% of women have never achieved orgasm.
  • 14% of women under 35 have never achieved orgasm during intercourse.
  • 43% of women experience infrequent orgasms.
  • As many as 50% of women do not feel satisfied with the frequency they can achieve orgasm.
  • Intimacy issues, relationship worries, socio-cultural factors, medications, and medical conditions can all cause anorgasmia.
  • DNA and genes make up anywhere between 33% to 60% of a woman’s ability to orgasm.
  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy, changes in attitude, and decreasing anxiety are the best ways to treat anorgasmic dysfunction.
  • There are currently no known pharmaceutical agents proven to increase a woman’s ability to orgasm.

The Many Types Of Female Orgasms

A wide range of erotic stimulation can induce the female orgasm, including both genital and nongenital stimulation.

However, unlike men, women can achieve several different types of orgasms.

Let’s take a look!

Type Of OrgasmDescription
Vaginal OrgasmCaused by indirect clitoral stimulation during intercourse and vaginal penetration.
Clitoral OrgasmCaused by direct clitoral stimulation.
G-spot OrgasmAn orgasm caused by stimulation of the G-spot, which may result in the expulsion of a clear fluid mixed with urine from the urethra.
Blended OrgasmCaused by a combination of clitoral and vaginal stimulation.
Anal OrgasmAn orgasm caused by anal stimulation or penetration.
  • Women experience a shorter recovery period than men, allowing them to experience multiple orgasms in a shorter period.
  • Between 15% and 43% of women say they have multiple orgasms.
  • 18% of Finnish women between 18 and 70 report multiple orgasms.
  • Women can orgasm solely as a response to visual stimuli without any direct physical stimulation. This is known as an image-induced orgasm
  • Women can sometimes achieve orgasm through stimulation of the nipples.

What Is A G-Spot Orgasm?

The Grafenberg spot, or G-spot, is a small, sensitive area located on the upper vaginal wall about one to one and a half inches inside the vulva.

During sexual arousal, a woman’s G-spot swells and becomes extra sensitive.

  • A G-spot orgasm is often more intense than a vaginal or clitoral orgasm.
  • G-spot orgasms may result in the expulsion of female ejaculate from the Skene’s gland, often referred to as squirting.
  • An estimated 10% of women ejaculate when they have a G-spot orgasm.
  • While all women have G-spot tissue, not every woman enjoys G-spot stimulation.
  • Experts believe that all women can squirt. However, it’s estimated that only between 10% and 50% do.

What Is The Orgasm Gap?

The orgasm gap is the difference between the number of men and women who orgasm reliably and consistently.

  • In the US, 95% of straight men report usually or always having an orgasm during intercourse.
  • Only 65% of straight women reliably achieve orgasm from intercourse.
  • In general, women value their partner’s orgasm more than their orgasm.
  • Many cultural factors contribute to the orgasm gap between men and women.
  • The best way to close the orgasm gap is better sex education and increased awareness surrounding female orgasms for men and women of all ages.

Factors That Contribute to The Orgasm Gap

There are a number of factors that contribute to the orgasm gap, including social and cultural factors, medical and psychological factors, and sexual practices. Here are ten factors that contribute to the orgasm gap:

  • Stigma and shame surrounding female sexuality can lead to women feeling embarrassed or ashamed to express their sexual needs.
  • Lack of sex education can leave women feeling confused or uninformed about their bodies and sexual desires.
  • Cultural and societal norms that prioritize male pleasure and view female pleasure as secondary can contribute to the orgasm gap.
  • Medical conditions such as endometriosis or pelvic pain can make it difficult or painful to achieve orgasm.
  • Mental health issues such as anxiety or depression can interfere with sexual desire and response.
  • Inadequate foreplay or lack of attention to female pleasure during sexual encounters can make it difficult for women to achieve orgasm.
  • Misinformation or myths about female sexuality can contribute to misunderstandings and unrealistic expectations.
  • Lack of communication between sexual partners about sexual needs and desires can make it difficult for women to receive adequate stimulation.
  • Gender inequality in the workplace and in other areas of life can contribute to stress and anxiety that interfere with sexual desire and response.
  • Negative experiences with sex, such as sexual trauma or assault, can make it difficult to enjoy sexual activity and achieve orgasm.

Sources


Asexuality Statistics [2024 Data] – How Many Americans Are Asexuals?

Asexuality, defined as the lack of sexual attraction to any gender, is a topic that is not widely discussed or understood.

While it is often thought to be a rare or nonexistent orientation, recent studies have shown that asexuality is more common than previously thought.

This article will explore the latest statistics and research on asexuality, including prevalence rates, demographic trends, and what are the odds of being sexual.

asexuality statistics

Key Asexuality Statistics

  • 6.4% of asexuals are engaged or married.
  • 1% or less of the world population is asexual.
  • 53.1% of asexuals are American.
  • 0.08% of all Americans identify as asexuals.
  • 11.3% of asexuals are in California.
  • 67.7% of aces consider themselves asexual.
  • 10.7% of aces consider themselves gray-asexual.
  • 65.5% of asexuals consider themselves queer.
  • 16.7% of asexuals would like to identify as straight if not asexual, gray-asexual, or demisexual.
  • 36.7% of asexuals consider themselves aromantic.
  • 13.9% of asexuals have man or male as their gender identity.
  • 56% of asexuals have woman or female as their gender identity.
  • 46.5% of asexuals are aged 18-24.
  • Considering all age groups, the average age of asexuals is 24.6 years.
  • 23.1% of asexuals have a Bachelor’s degree.
  • 18.3% of asexuals are high school or secondary school students.
  • 25.9% of asexuals are working full-time.
  • 26.9% of asexuals are atheists.
  • 86.2% of asexuals are white or of European descent.
  • 6.4% of asexuals are engaged or married.
  • 17.5% of asexuals are in an unmarried relationship.
  • 42.4% of aces have been in a romantic relationship.
  • 82.2% of asexuals experience some kind of sexual violence.
  • 82.9% of binary asexual women experienced sexual violence in some form.
  • 12% of asexuals experienced sexual harassment.
  • 45.3% of asexuals feel repulsive or aversive about having sex.
  • 47.1% of asexuals had sex because they were curious about it.
  • 41.2% of asexuals think they are mentally ill.
  • 53.5% of asexuals have experienced a depressive disorder.
  • 61.3% of asexuals thought about suicide.

Which Country has the Most Asexuals?

Studies on asexuality have mainly been conducted in Western countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom, and the results from those studies suggest that about 1% of the population identifies as asexual.

Here are some more interesting facts and figures related to Asexuality in different countries.

Country% of Asexuals
United States of America53.10%
United Kingdom9%
Canada7.50%
Germany4.40%
Australia4.30%
France2%
Brazil1.80%
Italy1.30%
Spain1.10%
Netherlands1.40%
Other13.40%

How Many Americans Are Asexuals?

  • Almost 260,000 Americans are asexuals.
  • 0.08% of all Americans identify as asexuals.
  • 1.7% of Americans identify as asexuals who are part of the LGBTQ+ community.

Which State Has The Most Asexuals?

Here are some interesting facts and figures about the US states with most numbers of Asexuals.

US State or Territory% of Asexuals
California11.30%
Texas6.90%
New York5.90%
Washington5.90%
Pennsylvania5.10%
Florida4.10%
Massachusetts3.90%
Michigan3.80%
Illinois3.70%

Which Sexual Orientation Label Asexuals Mostly Identify With?

Asexual individuals primarily identify with the asexual orientation label. This label indicates that a person does not experience sexual attraction or has a low interest in sexual activity.

Some asexual individuals may also identify with other labels, such as graysexual or demisexual, which indicate a more nuanced experience of sexual attraction.

  • 67.7% of aces consider themselves asexual.
  • 10.7% of aces consider themselves gray-asexual.
  • 9.0% of aces consider themselves demisexual.
  • 7.0% of asexuals are questioning.

Are Asexuals Queer?

Not all asexual people identify as queer and some may prefer to identify only as asexual. The relationship between asexuality and queerness is complex and personal, and ultimately, whether someone identifies as queer is a matter of their own self-identification and understanding.

  • 65.5% of asexuals consider themselves queer.
  • 17.5% of asexuals are unsure if they are queer or not.
  • 16.9% of asexuals are not queer.

Are Asexuals Straight?

As mentioned before, not all Asexuals identify as straight or queer. Here are some interesting statistics that answer this question.

  • 16.7% of asexuals would like to identify as straight if not asexual, gray-asexual, or demisexual.
  • 22.7% of gray asexuals would rather identify as straight than any other identity.
  • 23% of demisexuals would rather identify as straight than any other identity.
  • 13% of asexuals would rather identify as straight than any other identity.

Are Asexuals Aromantic?

Aromanticism is a romantic orientation and it is distinct from asexuality which is a sexual orientation.

It is possible for an individual to be asexual and aromantic, meaning that they do not experience sexual attraction or romantic attraction. Similarly, it is also possible for an individual to be asexual and not aromantic, meaning that they do not experience sexual attraction but do experience romantic attraction.

  • 36.7% of asexuals consider themselves aromantic.
  • 20.8% of asexuals are unsure if they are aromantic or not.
  • 33.7% of asexuals are not aromantic.

Gender Demographics for Asexuals

Asexuality is a sexual orientation that is not based on gender, and it is found across all genders. Studies have shown that asexuality is reported by individuals of all genders, including men, women, and non-binary people.

Are Males Asexuals?

  • 13.9% of asexuals have man or male as their gender identity.

Are Females Asexuals?

  • 56% of asexuals have woman or female as their gender identity.

Are Asexuals Transgenders?

  • 17.9% of asexuals have transgender as their gender identity.
  • 76.1% of demiguys are likely to identify as transgender.
  • 74.4% of bigenders are likely to identify as transgender.
  • 69.5% of neutrois people are likely to identify as transgender.

Age Demographic for Asexuals

Studies have shown that asexuality can be found across all age groups. Check out the table to know more about the topic in detail.

Age group% of Asexuals
18-2446.50%
25-3428.20%
14-1716.20%
35-446.40%
45+2.70%

What is The Average Age of Asexuals?

  • Considering all age groups, the average age of asexuals is 24.6 years.

Education Demographic for Asexuals

Asexual individuals had a higher level of education than the general population. The study found that asexual individuals were more likely to have completed a university degree or higher education than the general population.

  • 33.1% of asexuals are studying in higher education but haven’t got a degree yet.
  • 23.1% of asexuals have a Bachelor’s degree.
  • 17.2% of asexuals have not completed high school yet.
  • 11.3% of asexuals have completed secondary education.

Are High School Students Asexuals?

Asexual individuals may start to realize that they are asexual at different ages, and it is possible for high school students to identify as asexual.

  • 18.3% of asexuals are high school or secondary school students.
  • 29.5% of asexuals are in an undergraduate program.
  • 7.5% of asexuals are in a graduate program.
  • 43.1% of asexuals are not students.

Employment Status of Asexuals

  • 25.9% of asexuals are working full-time.
  • 20.5% of asexuals are working part-time.
  • 32.4% of asexuals are unemployed because they are students.
  • 13.8% of asexuals are not working.

What is the Race and Religion of Asexuals?

People of all races and religions can identify as asexual. Asexuality is simply the lack of sexual attraction to others and it is not related to a person’s race, ethnicity, or religious beliefs. Asexuality is a sexual orientation, and as such, it is not linked to any specific race or religion.

Religion of Asexuals:

  • 26.9% of asexuals are atheists.
  • 18.3% of asexuals are agnostics.
  • 6.4% of asexuals are protestants.
  • 2.3% of asexuals are Jews.
  • 0.7% of asexuals are Muslim.

Race of Asexuals:

  • 86.2% of asexuals are white or of European descent.
  • 6.8% of asexuals are multi-racial.
  • 5.4% of asexuals are Hispanic.
  • 5.3% of asexuals are Latinx.
  • 4.5% of asexuals are east-Asians.

Do Asexuals Have Relationships?

Yes, asexual people can have relationships. Asexuality is a lack of sexual attraction, but it does not mean a lack of romantic attraction or a lack of desire for intimacy and companionship.

  • 76.1% of asexuals are single.
  • 6.4% of asexuals are engaged or married.
  • 17.5% of asexuals are in an unmarried relationship.
  • 51.5% of aces have been in a significant relationship.
  • 42.4% of aces have been in a romantic relationship.
  • 31.3% of aces have been in a non-romantic relationship.

Do Asexuals Feel Non-Romantic Attraction?

  • 68% of asexuals feel aesthetic attraction.
  • 65.3% of asexuals feel platonic attraction.
  • 33.4% of asexuals feel sensual attraction.

Do Asexuals Experience Sexual Violence?

Asexual people may be at risk of sexual violence because of the misconceptions and stereotypes that exist about asexuality, such as the idea that asexual people are not capable of experiencing sexual pleasure or that they are not “real” sexual beings.

  • 82.2% of asexuals experience some kind of sexual violence.
  • 73.9% of asexuals experience non-contact sexual violence.
  • 55.2% of asexuals experience unwanted sexual contact.

Are Asexual Women More Likely to be Sexually Violated?

  • 82.9% of binary asexual women experience sexual violence in some form.
  • 87.5% of non-binary asexual women experience sexual violence in some form.
  • In comparison, 63.2% of binary ace men and 79.4% of non-binary ace men face sexual violence of some form.

Do Asexuals Experience Harassment?

  • 31.5% of asexuals experience online harassment.
  • 30.9% of asexuals experience verbal harassment.
  • 12% of asexuals experience sexual harassment.

Do Asexuals Engage in Sex?

Asexual people, like all individuals, have diverse experiences and desires when it comes to sexual activity. Some asexual people may choose to engage in sexual activity, while others may not.

  • 45.3% of asexuals feel repulsive or aversive about having sex.
  • 25.3% of asexuals feel indifferent about engaging in sex.
  • 16.7% of asexuals are uncertain about engaging in sex.
  • 26% of asexuals have had consensual sex.

Why do Asexuals Have Sex?

  • 69.1% of asexuals engage in sex because they want to please their partners.
  • 53.5% of asexuals do it because they were romantically attracted to the person.
  • 47.1% of asexuals had sex because they were curious about it.

What Struggles do Asexuals Have?

Asexual people may face a variety of struggles related to their sexual orientation. One of the main struggles that asexual people face is invisibility. This can make it difficult for them to find representation, information, and support.

  • 41.2% of asexuals think they are mentally ill.
  • 30.4% of asexuals think they are neurodivergent.
  • 58.5% of asexuals have experienced an anxiety disorder.
  • 53.5% of asexuals have experienced the depressive disorder.

Do Asexuals Think About Suicide?

  • 61.3% of asexuals thought about suicide.
  • 29.7% of asexuals made plans to kill themselves.
  • 14.6% of aces tried killing themselves.

Sources


What Percentage of Sexless Marriages End in Divorce?

74.2% of sexless marriages end in divorce.

Marriages are considered to be sexless when the couple has sex less than 10 times in a single year. But what percentage of marriages are sexless? And how common are sexless marriages?

We’ve dug deep into numbers, facts, stats and surveys to answer these questions and more.

Let’s dive straight in!

sexless marriage statistics

Sexless Marriage Facts

  • 74.2% of sexless marriages end in divorce.
  • There are 20.4 million individuals that are in sexless marriages living in the US.
  • 77% of people that are in sexless marriages state that they would love to have more sex.
  • 15.6% of married people didn’t have sex last year.
  • Sex frequency in married couples decreased by half after the first year of marriage.
  • 70% of the time, women initiate divorce in sexless marriages.
  • 33% of women over the age of 45 are worried about their lack of libido.
  • After four years of marriage, only 48% of married women say that they want sex on a regular basis.
  • Low libido was reported in 12% of midlife women.
  • Low libido was reported in 7% of women over the age of 65.
  • Japan has the most sexless marriages with a reported 47.2% of marriages being sexless.
  • Marriages with no children are only 16% likely to have a sexless marriage, while those with at least one child were 30% more likely to.

How Many Married Men Don’t Have Sex?

While sexless marriage might seem like something couples suffer through together, the truth is that that isn’t always the case.

While adultery isn’t always the first reaction to a sexless marriage, it would explain how the amount of married men and married women that don’t have sex are different.

  • 1.7% of married men don’t have sex.
  • 5.2% of married men have sex 1-2 times a year.
  • 35.4% of married men have sex 1-3 times a month.
  • 57.6% of married men have sex at least once a week.

How Many Married Women Don’t Have Sex?

It seems as though the numbers for women show that they end up having sex more often while still being in sexless marriages.

Considering this fact, the difference in numbers between men and women adds to the statistic of divorced couples.

  • 1.3% of married women don’t have sex.
  • 5.5% of married women have sex 1-2 times a year.
  • 32.4% of married women have sex 1-3 times a month.
  • 60.9% of married women have sex at least once a week.

Does Age Have Anything To Do With Having A Sexless Marriage?

One might assume that the number of people in sexless marriages would climb as you look at older ages, and that’s correct.

While the numbers rise with age, that also means that those numbers include older people with sexual dysfunctions and medical conditions.

  • 3.5% of married 20 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 4.6% of married 25 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 6.5% of married 30 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 7.9% of married 35 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 15.6% of married 40 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 19.8% of married 45 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 23.9% of married 50 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 25.8% of married 55 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 29.1% of married 60 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 32% of married 65 year olds didn’t have sex last year.
  • 34.1% of married 70 year olds didn’t have sex last year.

Does How Long You’ve Been Married Affect Having A Sexless Marriage?

The more time spent with the same person, the more one might become bored of bedroom antics and fun.

With more time together comes the fact that it takes more to continue having the libido one might have in the honeymoon stage of their marriage.

  • Of marriages that last 0-10 years, 5.6% are sexless.
  • Of marriages that last 10-20 years, 13.7% are sexless.
  • Of marriages that last 20-30 years, 20.1% are sexless.
  • Of marriages that last 30-40 years, 28.9% are sexless.

What’s The Average Amount Of Sex For Married Couples?

Now that numbers have been established for the amount of people not having sex, it is time to compare those numbers with the averages people are hoping to accomplish.

Not all marriages are sexless, but the older couples become, the closer they get to being on the sexless marriage list.

  • People who are married for 0-10 years have sex 107 times a year on average.
  • People who are married for 10-20 years have sex 69 times a year on average.
  • People who are married for 20-30 years have sex 42 times a year on average.
  • People who are married for 30-40 years have sex 36 times a year on average.

Which Generation Has The Most Sexless Marriages?

The gap in sexless marriages by generation can be attributed to the fact that the younger generations don’t have that much time to be married yet.

It also seems to stem from the fact that starting in the Millennial generation, people started waiting to get married longer, and they even manage to stay together longer.

  • 33.1% of married Baby Boomers are in sexless marriages.
  • 22.9% of married Generation X couples are in sexless marriages.
  • 7.4% of married Millennial couples are in sexless marriages.
  • 2.3% of married Generation Z couples are in sexless marriages.

What Are The Reasons For Sexless Marriages?

Most of the time, sexless marriages aren’t a conscious decision, and sometimes, it’s one of those things that simply happens over time.

For some people, the reasons behind sexless marriages are fixable, but sometimes, that simply isn’t the case.

  • Relationship Issues
  • Children
  • Lack of Love
  • Lacking sexdrive
  • Mental health issues
  • Stress at work
  • Hormonal imbalance
  • Trauma from past
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Medical reasons

What Do Sexless Marriages Cause?

While divorce seems to be the main go to for people who are in sexless marriages, there are many other results of a sexless marriage that don’t get as much attention.

For every person that divorces out of a sexless marriage, there is another person that stays and has to deal with the consequences.

  • Low Self Esteem
  • Consider divorce
  • Loneliness
  • Resentment
  • Guilt
  • Unhappy
  • Infidelity
  • “Sexual avoidance cycle”
  • Less Patience
  • Inadequacy

Can A Sexless Marriage Lead To Unhappiness?

According to a survey, people who only have sex less than once a week end up being much more unhappy than those that have more. While sex isn’t the key to happiness in a long term relationship, it definitely is a key factor for most relationships.

How Important Is Sex In A Marriage?

According to a recent poll:

  • 39% of people in a sexless marriage believe that intimacy isn’t important for a couple to show how happy they are with each other.
  • 61% of people in a sexless marriage believe that intimacy is crucial and wish that it would change.

Whether the 39% of people have figured out a way to cope or have low to non-existent libidos could be potential reasons behind the lack of need for intimacy.

How Do People Survive Sexless Marriages?

Surviving a sexless marriage can be a daunting task, but with some understanding, it’s manageable.

While the best advice is to seek professional help from a doctor or psychiatrist, there are other options to explore if you’re so inclined to.

According to a survey, many people in a sexless marriage find that turning their relationship into an open marriage ended up being the solution for them.

An open marriage gives each partner more freedom to explore their sexual desires while removing the worry of infidelity.

Is Cheating While In A Sexless Marriage Wrong?

Infidelity is more common in sexless marriages, but that doesn’t answer the question of whether or not a partner would think it’s excusable.

According to a survey:

  • 91% of Americans believe that extramarital sex is wrong no matter the reason.

This has risen over the last years

  • 40 years ago only 70% of Americans thought cheating was wrong no matter the reason.

This doesn’t stop people from having extramarital relations though. According to another survey:

  • 46% of married people stated that they are having affairs.
  • Amazingly, 24% of marriages that had dealt with infidelity actually stayed together.
  • Due to cheating spouses, 47.5% of those marriages said that they established new rules for their relationship to minimize the possibility of more affairs.

Sources


How Common is Premature Ejaculation? [2024 Data] – Statistics Report

Premature ejaculation is a problem that affects many men, and in some cases, it has led to relationships being cut short.

While there are products and techniques that can help alleviate the stress of premature ejaculation, many people are unaware of them.

Premature ejaculation, or PE, is the most common sexual dysfunction that affects males, and 89% of men with PE say that pleasing their woman is extremely important to them.

premature ejaculation statistics

Key Premature Ejaculation Stats

  • 30% of men across all age groups are affected by PE.
  • On average, 43% of men with premature ejaculation don’t last longer than 2 minutes.
  • Men with higher education, social phobia, and divorce suffer from premature ejaculation more frequently.
  • On average, sex lasts around 7.3 minutes
  • 31% of men with PE stated their sexual satisfaction was poor or very poor.
  • The risk of PE decreases with age, as PE is more common with younger men.
  • PE distress increases the risk of even more erectile dysfunctions and depression in a sexual couple.
  • A study found that some medications was able to prolong ejaculation by 9.7%
  • Topical 4% Benzocaine wipes actually delay ejaculation by 231.5 seconds.
  • With PE, ejaculation usually occurs 1-2 minutes after penetration.

How Common is Premature Ejaculation?


PE affects all men across every age group and race, but certain groups seem to be more at risk.

While there are exceptions to each group, it seems as though these factors are prevalent when it comes to premature ejaculation.

Premature Ejaculation By Race

  • 29% of Hispanics are affected by premature ejaculation.
  • 21% of African Americans are affected by premature ejaculation
  • 16% of Whites are affected by premature ejaculation.

Premature Ejaculation By Regions

  • 59% of PE diagnoses are from men of Middle Eastern or Asian descent.
  • 41% of PE diagnoses are from men of Western or European descent.

Premature Ejaculation By Age

  • Men between the ages 18 and 30 years of age are most likely to be affected by PE
  • Men between the ages of 45 and 65 years of age are affected by PE as a secondary impotence.

What Causes a Man to Come so Fast?

Age and race seem to play a part in the statistics of PE, but there are plenty of other health and psychological factors that can be attributed to PE.

Premature ejaculation isn’t necessarily passed on genetically, some of the factors that lead to it are considered to be genetic.

  • Causes of PE can include:
    • Depression
    • Stress
    • Lack of confidence
    • Irregular levels of brain chemicals, like serotonin
    • Prostate or urethra infection
    • Irregular hormone levels
    • Guilty feelings
    • Prostatitis
    • Relationship issues
    • Earlier sexual experiences
    • Worry about sexual performances
    • Hypersensitive nerves

How Many People Receive Pharmacotherapy For Premature Ejaculation?

For quite some time, it was difficult to draw the proper statistics for something like premature ejaculation considering the stigma surrounding it.

Now, men are more likely to admit to the condition, but that doesn’t mean that they are open to or know about treatment that can help alleviate symptoms.

Pharmacotherapy has proven to be beneficial in managing premature ejaculation, but not all men are seeking help for it.

  • Pharmacotherapy solutions by percentage
    • 37.9% of premature ejaculation diagnosis are being treated with SSRI
    • 11.8% of premature ejaculation diagnosis are being treated by topical and local anesthetics
    • 7.8% of premature ejaculation diagnosis are being treated by PDE-5i
    • 4.1% of premature ejaculation diagnosis are being treated by Alpha Blockers
    • 5% of premature ejaculation diagnosis are being treated by prescription medicine
    • 51.7% of premature ejaculation diagnosis are untreated

How Many Types Of Premature Ejaculation Are There?

It’s fair to say that there are different ways to end up with a premature ejaculation diagnosis, and each of them can be treated differently.

While some types will require medication or medical procedures, others might be curable through psychotherapy or exercises.

In 1943, Schapiro classified two separate groups of PE, but now, that number has doubled to four.

Lifelong PE is when it affects someone since their first sexual encounter. Acquired PE develops on its own with no prior issues.

Variable PE only happens with specific partners or certain situations. Subjective PE is when the man believes that he’s premature, but sex still lasts between 3 and 20 minutes.

  • 2.3-3.2% of the population suffer from Lifelong Premature Ejaculation
  • 3.9-4.8% of the population suffer from Acquired Premature Ejaculation
  • 8.5-11.4% of the population suffer from Variable Premature Ejaculation
  • 5.1-6.4% of the population suffer from Subjective Premature Ejaculation

Are There Different Severities Of Premature Ejaculation?

Many men believe that they don’t last long enough, but more men ejaculate around the average duration than they would think.

While there are different reasons for having PE issues, there are also different levels of premature ejaculation that are based on just how long they actually last.

  • Mild Premature Ejaculation usually lasts anywhere between 30 seconds and 1 minute after penetration.
  • Mediocre Premature Ejaculation usually lasts anywhere between 15 and 30 seconds after penetration.
  • Severe Premature Ejaculation usually lasts less than 15 seconds after penetration or before sexual activity starts.

What are the Most Common Consequences of Premature Ejaculation?

Naturally, premature ejaculation can cause a lot of pressure to be put on the man to find a way to last longer for his partner, and this can cause it to be even worse.

While it might not be a problem for some couples, others who believe sex to be a key part of their relationship have stated that premature ejaculation was a condition that they couldn’t overlook.

The idea of premature ejaculation is enough to cause stress in any sexual encounter, but the added stress can only compound the issue.

There were three main reasons for sexual distress:

  • 47.6% of men who suffer from PE state that focusing on their subpar performance causes sexual distress
  • 39.9% of men who suffer from PE state the short time between penetration and ejaculation causes sexual distress
  • 24.1% of men who suffer from PE state the lack of ejaculatory control causes sexual distress.

Can Premature Ejaculation Cause Relationship Problems?

Not only is premature ejaculation a stressor for the man, but it can also cause problems in relationships if sex is a huge factor for the couple.

While there are some techniques and medications out there that can help, some couples might not make it long enough to see results.

This in itself can add even more pressure to the man to figure out how to fix the problem, but that pressure only makes the condition worse.

  • According to a survey of couples where the man had premature ejaculation, women considered PE to be an obstacle.
    • 40% of women were more satisfied as a couple with men without premature ejaculation.
    • 20% of women were extremely unsatisfied with men who had premature ejaculation.
    • 40% of women weren’t unsatisfied with a man who had premature ejaculation

While premature ejaculation isn’t looked down on like it used to, the mental weight of the condition still carries its toll on couples worldwide.

More men are admitting to dealing with this condition, but as of now, there’s no sure way to deal with it permanently.


Sources


STI & STD Statistics [2024 Data] – How Many People Have It?

Whether you’re male, female, heterosexual, gay, or anything else in between, if you’re sexually active, you risk contracting a sexually transmitted infection.

But just how common are STIs? What’s the most common STI? And should you be worried about syphilis?

Below, we dive into a slew of statistics to explore everything there is to know about sexually transmitted infections.

Let’s go!

sti std statistics

Key STI/STD Statistics

  • More than 1 million STIs are acquired every day.
  • 68 million people are estimated to currently have an STI.
  • There are 374 million new STIs diagnosed each year.
  • 50% of individuals say they know someone who has been infected with an STI.
  • African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely to acquire an STI than Caucasians.
  • STI cases reached an all-time high for the sixth consecutive year in 2021.
  • 37% increase in STD cases between 2014 and 2019.
  • 50% of STI acquisitions are young adults aged 15 to 24.
  • More than 34,000 young Americans have HIV.
  • 30% of young adult women have not been tested for STIs in the past year.
  • 63% of young adult men have not been tested in the past year.
  • African-Americans, Indigenous people, and Hispanics are 2 to 8 times more likely to have an STI compared to Caucasians.
  • HPV is the most common STI in the world.
  • 51% of Americans aren’t sure if HPV is curable or not.
  • By age 50, 80% of women will have HPV. 10% of those women will develop a higher risk of cervical cancer.
  • 1 in 5 Americans have an STI.
  • Half of all Americans will acquire an STI in their lives.
  • $16 billion USD was spent treating STIs in 2018.
  • As many as 35% of teens have HPV.
  • 1 in 6 Americans has herpes.
  • 67% of people worldwide have herpes.
  • More than two million cases of trichomoniasis reported in 2018.
  • 70% of trichomoniasis infections are asymptomatic.
  • New cases of syphilis have increased by 74%.
  • Asian people are 30% less likely to acquire syphilis.
  • Cases of congenital syphilis have quadrupled in the United States.

How Common Are STIs?

Unfortunately, many experts say that cases of sexually transmitted infections are on the rise.

So, just how common are STIs? And how many people get an STI yearly?

  • Globally, people contract more than 1 million STIs every day.
  • New STI cases increased by 1% between 2020 and 2021.
  • In 2018, experts estimated a staggering 68 million STIs worldwide.
  • Three hundred seventy-four million new sexually transmitted infections are contracted every year.
  • 25% of newly acquired STIs are curable.
  • Older adults are less likely to know someone who has been infected with an STI.
  • 60% of women say they know someone who has had a sexually transmitted infection.
  • 50% of people say they know someone who has had a sexually transmitted disease.
  • 1 in 3 adults in the US says they are aware that STIs are more common today than in the past.
  • STIs are more prevalent in African-American and Hispanic adults compared to Caucasians.
  • 13% of African-American and Hispanic adults worry about acquiring an STI.
  • Only 5% of Caucasian adults worry about STIs.
  • In 2021, STD cases reached an all-time high for the sixth consecutive year.
  • In 2019, more than 2.5 million syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea infections were reported.
  • Between 2014 and 2019, there were approximately 37% more newly diagnosed STI cases.

What Age Group Has The Highest STI rates?

It’s believed that STIs are significantly more common in teenagers and young adults. However, all age groups are impacted by sexually transmitted infections.

  • Most STI carriers are young people.
  • Nearly 50% of STI contractions were by young adults between the ages of 15 and 24.
  • Sexually active high school students and young adults are at the highest risk of contracting an STI.
  • Teens and young adults only make up 25% of the sexually active population. However, they make up roughly 50% of all newly diagnosed cases of STIs.
  • People under the age of 65 are generally more aware of STI treatments than those older than 65.
  • In 2009, more than 34,000 American young people between 13 and 24 lived with an active HIV infection.
  • 1 in 3 teenagers says they do not know HIV is a sexually transmitted infection.

Prevalence Of Chlamydia And Gonorrhea By Age Group

 Ages 15 - 19Ages 20 - 24Ages 25 - 29Ages 30 - 39Age 40+
Chlamydia30%40%16%10%4%
Gonorrhea25%35%17%14%9%

*CDC data from 2012

Which Gender Has A Higher Rate Of STDs?

  • Females are at a higher risk than males for contracting a sexually transmitted infection.
  • Only 1 in 3 female teenagers and 45% of young adult women (aged 19 to 25) have discussed STIs with their healthcare providers within the past three years.
  • Women get checked for STIs more often than men.
  • 70% of young adult women have been tested for STIs in the past year.
  • Only 37% of young adult men have been tested.

What Race Has The Highest STD rate?

  • Black or African-American people are 5 to 8 times more likely to have an STI.
  • Indigenous people are 3 to 5 times more likely to have an STI.
  • Latino or Hispanic people are 1 to 2 times more likely to have an STI.

What’s The Most Common STD?

Before diving into the most common STIs and STDs in society, it’s essential to learn the difference between STIs and STDs.

STI stands for Sexually Transmitted Infection, whereas STD stands for Sexually Transmitted Disease.

Although many sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS, start as infections, not all do.

Additionally, many STIs can go unnoticed without any symptoms.

Therefore, it’s more accurate to call them infections rather than diseases.

So what’s the most common STD/STI?

  • The human papillomavirus—or HPV—is considered the most prevalent STI worldwide, with more than 79 million cases in the US.
  • There are more than 150 strains of the human papillomavirus.
  • Most often, HPV causes painless warts that clear up without treatment in two years.
  • There are 13 strains of HPV capable of causing cervical cancer, and at least one variant is linked to cancer of the penis, vagina, vulva, anus, head, and neck.
  • More than 40 variants of HPV can infect not only the genital region but also the mucosa of the mouth and throat.
  • Roughly 51% of American adults say they are unsure whether HPV is curable.
  • Most people who have HPV are unaware they are infected.
  • 80% of women by age 50 will have acquired an HPV infection at least once.
  • Men often carry HPV but are less likely to show symptoms than women.
  • 1 in 10 women with an HPV infection on their cervix will develop complications putting them at a higher risk of cancer.

What Percent Of People Have An STI/STD In The US?

As you can see, STIs and STDs are incredibly prevalent in society throughout the world.

But what about the United States? Who has more STDs, males or females? And what state has the most STDs?

  • Approximately 20% of Americans have some form of sexually transmitted infection.
  • There are 20 million new sexually transmitted infections reported in the United States each year.
  • More than 50% of Americans will be diagnosed with an STI at some point.
  • An estimated 110 million men and women in the US are currently infected with an STI.
  • 54% of Americans say they know someone who has or has had an STI.
  • 8% of the US public worry about acquiring an STI within the following year.
  • Over 51% of Americans know that chlamydia, syphilis, and gonorrhea are curable.
  • Only 59% of Americans know that genital herpes is incurable.

Most Common STIs In The US By Type

STI TypePrevalence
HPV42.5 million cases
Herpes18.6 million cases
Trichomoniasis2.2 million cases
Chlamydia2.4 million cases
HIV984,000 cases
Gonorrhea209,000 cases
Syphilis156,000 cases
Hepatitis B103000

*statistics from 2018

The Cost Of STIs On The US Public Health System

  • In 2018, experts estimated that nearly $16 billion in healthcare funding was spent on treating STIs.
  • 25% of that money was directly attributed to treating STIs in women.
  • Another 26% was spent treating STIs in young adults aged 15 to 24.
  • $1.1 billion was spent treating chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis, easily preventable infections.
STI TypeDirect Medical Spending (2018)
Hepatitis B$46 million
Herpes simplex virus$91 million
Trichomoniasis$144 million
Syphilis$174 million
Gonorrhea$271 million
Chlamydia$691 million
HPV$775 million
HIV$13.7 billion

What Are The 3 Most Common STDs?

Because many STDs are asymptomatic, it’s impossible to tell how many people are carrying a sexually transmitted virus or infection at any time.

However, in 2018, HPV, herpes, trichomoniasis, and gonorrhea accounted for roughly 98% of all ongoing STI infections.

Below, we’ve listed a few facts about three of the most common STDs in the world.

#1 – The Human Papillomavirus

  • The human papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted infection.
  • HPV has been linked to more than 300,000 cases of cervical cancer resulting in death each year.
  • As many as 35% of teenagers between 14 and 19 are infected with HPV.
  • Gardasil and Cervarix are FDA-approved vaccinations against HPV and can be administered as early as age 9 to protect against future infection.

#2 – Herpes

  • Genital herpes, caused by the herpes simplex virus, is the second most common STI.
  • More than 500 million individuals between 15 and 59 are believed to be carrying the herpes simplex virus.
  • 1 in 6 Americans aged 14 to 49 is walking around with genital herpes infections.
  • 67% of the global population is estimated to carry the herpes virus.
  • Genital herpes is more common in women.
  • 20% of women have genital herpes.
  • 11% of men have genital herpes.

#3 – Trichomoniasis

  • Trichomoniasis is the third most common STI.
  • More than 2% of American women aged 14 to 49 have trichomoniasis.
  • Less than 1% of American men have it.
  • African-American and Hispanic women are as much as ten times more likely to contract trich.
  • In 2018, there were more than two million trichomoniasis cases in the US.
  • Only about 30% of those infected with trichomoniasis show any symptoms.
  • 70% of trichomoniasis cases are asymptomatic.
  • Trichomoniasis increases the body’s ability to contract and spread other sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.

What Percentage Of People Have Syphilis?

Although HPV, herpes, and trichomoniasis are the most prevalent STIs, other infections, like syphilis, are also extremely common in society.

So who mostly has syphilis?

  • Men are the most prevalent carriers of the syphilis virus.
  • In 2020, there were more than 133,900 cases of syphilis in the US.
  • A significant majority of male syphilis cases occur in gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.
  • Since 2015, new cases of syphilis have increased by 74%.
  • During its primary and secondary stages, transmission from sexual contact is 10% to 30% likely.
  • If left untreated, 25% of individuals with syphilis will develop tertiary syphilis, causing irreversible damage to the brain, eyes, heart, liver, and other vital organs.
  • The virus is no longer infectious when it reaches the tertiary stage.
  • All stages of syphilis are easily treatable with antibiotics, such as penicillins.
  • Black, Hispanic, and Indigenous people are between 2 to 5 times more likely to contract syphilis compared to Caucasians.
  • Asian people are 30% less likely to acquire syphilis than Caucasian people.
  • Individuals between the ages of 25 and 29 are the most likely to contract the virus.

How Common Is Syphilis During Pregnancy?

  • Because of the virus’s effects on a newborn baby, pregnant women are particularly impacted by syphilis.
  • More than 2,100 cases of congenital syphilis were reported in 2020, resulting in at least 149 stillbirths or sudden infant death.
  • There is a 1 in 4 risk of death associated with congenital syphilis.
  • Between 2014 and 2019, cases of congenital syphilis quadrupled in the United States.
  • In 2016, at least one million pregnant women were believed to be infected with syphilis, resulting in more than 350,000 adverse births.

Sources


Sex Trafficking Statistics [2024 Data] – Who Do Sex Traffickers Prey On?

Sex trafficking is a global problem that affects millions of people around the world. It is a form of modern slavery in which individuals are recruited, transported, and exploited for profit.

The statistics on sex trafficking are alarming, with estimates suggesting that millions of people are trafficked for sexual exploitation every year.

In this article, you will learn about the disturbing facts and figures on sex trafficking, including the number of people affected by this crime, its red flags, and the factors that contribute to its growth.

sex trafficking statistics

Key Sex Trafficking Statistics

  • The global market value of the sex trafficking industry is estimated to be $150 Billion per year.
  • It is estimated that only 1% of sex trafficking victims are ever rescued.
  • The majority of sex trafficking victims are trafficked by someone they know, such as a family member, friend, or partner.
  • The average age of entry into prostitution is between 12 and 14 years old.
  • It is estimated that there are 24.9 Million victims of sex trafficking globally.
  • 65% of sex trafficking victims are women and girls.
  • 35% of sex trafficking victims are men and boys. 
  • 15.1 million of sex trafficking victims are from the Asia-Pacific region 
  • 4.1 million of sex trafficking victims are from Africa and Europe
  • 3.8 million are from Central Asia
  • The top three countries of origin for sex trafficking victims are India, China, Pakistan, Nigeria, North Korea, and Bangladesh.
  • 15,000 to 50,000 children and young adults are trafficked for sexual exploitation every year in the United States.

How Common is Sex Trafficking?

It is difficult to accurately estimate the prevalence of sex trafficking because it is a hidden crime that often goes undetected. However, it is widely acknowledged as a serious global problem that affects millions of people around the world.

According to the International Labor Organization, there are an estimated 24.9 million people trapped in modern slavery as a result of sex trafficking, with the majority being women and girls. Sex trafficking is especially prevalent in developing countries, but it also occurs in developed countries.

  • In the United States, the National Human Trafficking Hotline received 51,326 reports of human trafficking in 2021, with the majority of cases involving sex trafficking.
  • There are an estimated 24.9 million sex trafficking victims worldwide.
  • In Canada, there are between 1,500 and 2,200 victims of sex trafficking in the country at any given time.
  • About 15,000 to 50,000 children and young adults are trafficked for sexual exploitation every year in the United States.

How Many Sex Slaves are there in the World?

It is difficult to estimate the exact number of people who are being exploited as sex slaves, as this is a hidden crime that is often not detected. However, it is clear that sex trafficking is a widespread problem that affects millions of people around the world.

The International Labour Organization (ILO) estimates that there are 4.8 million victims of sexual exploitation, which includes both sexual slavery and sex trafficking.

Where is Sex Trafficking Most Common?

Sex trafficking can happen in any country, and traffickers often operate across international borders. However, some countries and regions are more vulnerable to sex trafficking due to various factors such as poverty, conflict, and lack of strong law enforcement.

It is most common in areas where there is poverty, conflict, and a weak rule of law, as these conditions create an environment in which traffickers can operate with impunity.

  • India has the highest number of people affected by sex trafficking in the world, with an estimated 4.1 million people trapped in modern slavery.
  • The Asia-Pacific region accounts for over 70% of all trafficking victims worldwide.
  • Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans are particularly affected by sex trafficking, with countries such as Bulgaria, Romania, and Ukraine being major source countries for victims.
  • In the Middle East, countries such as Syria and Yemen have been identified as major sources of sex trafficking victims.

Who has the Highest Rate of Human Trafficking?

  • India: 14 Million Sex Trafficking Victims
    China: 3.2 Million Sex Trafficking Victims
  • Pakistan: 2.1 Million Sex Trafficking Victims
  • Nigeria: Around 2 Million Sex Trafficking Victims
  • North Korea: Around 1.5 Million Sex Trafficking Victims

What are the Top 10 Cities for Human Trafficking?

It is difficult to identify the top 10 cities for human trafficking, as this is a hidden crime that often goes undetected. Human trafficking can occur in any city, and it is a global problem that affects every region in the world. That being said, some cities are known to have a higher prevalence of human trafficking.

Here are a few examples of cities that have been identified as being at high risk for human trafficking:

Mumbai

Mumbai is a major hub for human trafficking due to its large population and high demand for cheap labor and commercial sex.

Mexico City

Mexico City is a hub for human trafficking due to its location on the border with the United States as well as the high demand for cheap labor and commercial sex in the city.

Manila

Manila is a major hub for human trafficking due to its high demand for cheap labor and commercial sex, as well as its large population and high levels of poverty.

New Delhi

New Delhi is a major hub for human trafficking due to its large population and high demand for cheap labor and commercial sex.

Bangkok

Bangkok is a major hub for human trafficking due to its high demand for cheap labor and commercial sex, as well as its large population and high levels of poverty.

Istanbul

Istanbul is a major hub for human trafficking due to its location on the border with Europe and the high demand for cheap labor and commercial sex.

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro is a major hub for human trafficking due to its high demand for cheap labor and commercial sex, as well as its large population and high levels of poverty.

Moscow

Moscow is a major hub for human trafficking due to its high demand for cheap labor and commercial sex, as well as its large population and high levels of poverty.

New York City

New York City is a major hub for human trafficking due to its large population and diverse economy, which creates a demand for cheap labor and commercial sex.

What Age do Sex Traffickers Target?


Children are particularly vulnerable to exploitation in the sex trade.

However, adults are also at risk of being exploited. Both men and women can be victims of sex trafficking, and it is important to recognize and address the needs of all victims of this form of abuse and exploitation.

Sex traffickers often target vulnerable individuals who are seeking a better life or who are in a situation of desperation. This can include children, young women, and men who are from marginalized or impoverished communities, as well as migrants and refugees.

What is the Average Age of a Child who is Trafficked?

  • The average age of entry into the sex trade is between 12 and 14 years old.
  • Around 5.5 million children are victims of sexual exploitation worldwide.
  • Around 1 in 3 Sex Trafficking victims worldwide are children.
  • In the United States, the National Human Trafficking Hotline received 6,592 reports of child sex trafficking in 2020.
  • 19% of Child Sex Trafficking victims are from the age of 9 to 17 years old.
  • Only 4% of Child Sex Trafficking Victims are from the age of 1-8 years old.

What Age is Sex Trafficking Most Common?

  • Around 80% of the Sex Trafficking victims around the world are estimated to be adults.
  • Around 20% of the Sex Trafficking victims worldwide are Adult men.
  • Women are estimated to make up more than 50% of sex trafficking victims worldwide.
  • 19% of the trafficking victims are between 9 and 17 years old.
  • 18% of the trafficking victims are between 30 and 38 years old.
  • 12% of the trafficking victims are between 18 and 23 years old.
  • 11% of the trafficking victims are between 24 and 26 years old.
  • 9% of the trafficking victims are between 27 and 29 years old.
  • 8% of the trafficking victims are between 39 and 47 years old.
  • 5% of the trafficking victims are above the age of 48.
  • 4% of the trafficking victims are between 0 to 8 years old.

What Gender is Most Likely to Get Trafficked?

Human trafficking can affect people of all genders, ages, and backgrounds. However, certain groups may be more vulnerable to trafficking due to a variety of factors, such as poverty, social exclusion, lack of education, discrimination, and conflict.


For example, women and girls may be more vulnerable to trafficking for sexual exploitation, while men and boys may be more vulnerable to trafficking for forced labor. Children are particularly at risk of being trafficked, as they may be more vulnerable to manipulation and less able to defend themselves against exploitation.

What Percentage of Trafficking Victims are Female?

Sex trafficking affects both men and women, although women and girls are mainly affected by this form of abuse and exploitation. It is difficult to accurately estimate the prevalence of sex trafficking by gender, as this is a hidden crime that is often difficult to detect.

However, some studies have attempted to estimate the prevalence of sex trafficking by gender in different regions of the world.

  • Women and girls make up 65% of the victims of trafficking for sexual exploitation worldwide.
  • In the United States, the majority (80%) of sex trafficking victims involved females.
  • Above 90% of females are sex trafficked for sexual exploitation.
  • 99% of the trafficking victims in 2016 were women and girls.
  • Most female victims are between the age of 18 and 20.

Do Men Get Sex trafficked?

Although it is widely believed that this crime solely affects one gender, this is not true at all. Men have always been a target for sex traffickers and continue to be so. However, they are less in number as compared to women.

They are affected by forced labor trafficking, which often involves the exploitation of men in the construction, agriculture, and fishing industries. Men can also be vulnerable to sex trafficking in the context of migration and displacement.

Here are some facts and figures that portray the percentage of men as Sex Trafficking victims:

  • Men make up around 20% of sex trafficking victims detected globally.
  • A study estimated that around 20% of children who are commercially sexually exploited in the United States are male.
  • The highest % of male trafficking victims are from the higher age group.
  • 25% of the sex trafficking victims in 2012 globally were men.
  • 36% of the sex trafficking victims in 2016 were boys.
  • 29% of the sex trafficking victims globally are both men and boys.

What are the Red Flags and Indicators of Human Trafficking?

What are the 5 warning signs of human trafficking? What happens to the men who are sex trafficked? There are many red flags and indicators that may indicate that someone is a victim of human trafficking. Some common red flags include:

Control of Identification Documents

The person is not in control of their own identification documents, such as their passport or ID card.

Lack of Freedom

The person is not free to come and go as they please, and they may be accompanied by someone who controls their movements.

Fearfulness

The person is not able to communicate freely, or they may appear to be fearful or anxious.

Signs of Abuse

The person has not dressed appropriately for their work, and they may appear malnourished or have injuries or scars that suggest they have been physically abused.

Lack of Personal Possessions

The person is working long hours for little or no pay, and they may not have any personal possessions.

Who do Sex Traffickers Prey on?

Who is more likely to be sex trafficked? What type of people do human traffickers look for?

According to the UN Office of Drugs and Crime, Sex traffickers can target people of any age, gender, or background. However, they often prey on people who are vulnerable in some way, such as those who are homeless, living in poverty, or have a history of abuse. Sex traffickers may also target people who are in search of love or companionship, or who are seeking to escape from a difficult situation.

They may use a variety of tactics to lure victims, such as false promises of a better life or job opportunities, or offering drugs or alcohol to manipulate people. They may also use violence, threats, or manipulation to control victims.

Some other factors that may make people more vulnerable to being targeted by human traffickers include:

Lack of education

People who are not aware of the risks or who do not have access to information about safe migration practices may be more likely to fall victim to traffickers.

Social isolation

People who are isolated from their families or communities may be more vulnerable to exploitation, as they may have fewer social supports to turn to for help.

Displacement

People who are displaced due to conflict, natural disasters, or other factors may be more at risk of being trafficked, as they may be in search of shelter, food, or other basic necessities.

How to Know if You Are Being Targeted for Human Trafficking?

How do sex traffickers groom their victims? How do you not get trafficked? What tactics do human traffickers use? We will explain everything below.

It is important to be aware of the signs that you may be at risk of being targeted for human trafficking so that you can take steps to protect yourself and seek help if necessary.

Here are a few signs that you may be at risk of being targeted for human trafficking:

Suspicious Job or Travel Opportunity

You are approached by someone who tries to build a relationship with you, and who asks you to trust them or keep secrets from your friends and family.

Substance Abuse

You are given drugs or alcohol, or you are promised access to these substances, in exchange for performing a service or favor.

Uncomfortable Activities

You are asked to perform tasks or activities that make you feel uncomfortable, or that violate your personal values.

Threats or Intimidation

You are threatened or intimidated by someone who has power or control over you, or who has threatened to harm you or your loved ones.

Isolation

You are made to feel isolated or alone, and you do not have access to support or resources.

Sources


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